How well does a $17 cooler actually work?

JayzTwoCents
3 Mar 202423:18

Summary

TLDRIn this video, the host embarks on a budget-friendly adventure, reviewing the 'Dark Rock PX4' CPU cooler, which costs a surprisingly low $16.98. With intrigue and skepticism, he tests the cooler's performance on an Intel 13900K CPU, exploring various scenarios and configurations. Unexpectedly, the humble cooler exceeds expectations, keeping the high-end CPU remarkably cool under gaming and stress test conditions. The video offers a compelling look at an affordable cooling solution, challenging assumptions and demonstrating remarkable value for a modest price tag.

Takeaways

  • 💻 The video explores various unique PC-related products found on Amazon, indicating a trend towards innovative and niche tech accessories.
  • 🔌 Highlights a specific product, the Dark Rock PX4 cooler, priced at $16.98, raising questions about its quality and performance due to its low cost.
  • 🤖 Details the cooler's specifications, including its dimensions, compatibility with various CPU sockets, and a TDP (Thermal Design Power) of 200 watts.
  • 🔧 Includes an overview of included accessories like thermal paste and mounting hardware for both Intel and AMD CPUs, emphasizing the value of the package.
  • 💧 Expresses skepticism about the performance claims found in online reviews, particularly concerning cooling efficiency on high-performance CPUs.
  • 💨 Demonstrates the installation process, noting the cooler's physical compatibility with different motherboard layouts and potential adjustments needed for optimal fit.
  • 📺 Shares initial thermal performance tests using a high-end CPU, with observations on how the cooler manages under stress testing conditions.
  • 📌 Offers tips on voltage adjustments and BIOS settings to enhance cooling efficiency without compromising system stability.
  • 🛠 Discusses real-world gaming performance, showing how resolution and system settings impact CPU temperature and cooler performance.
  • 📈 Concludes with a positive assessment of the Dark Rock PX4's value, especially for mid-range CPUs, while warning that the product's price may increase following the video's exposure.

Q & A

  • What is the purpose of the video?

    -The main purpose of the video is to review and test the performance of the Dark Rock PX4 CPU cooler, which costs only $16.98 on Amazon.

  • What CPU was used for testing the cooler?

    -The video starts with testing the cooler on an Intel Core i9-13900K processor, but later the settings are adjusted to simulate the performance of other CPUs like the Core i5-13600K.

  • What were the temperature readings observed during the tests?

    -During the Cinebench R23 stress test with the 13900K, the cooler initially hit 100°C, but with voltage adjustments, temperatures were brought down to the low 80s. With the simulated 13600K settings, the maximum temperature observed was around 66°C.

  • How did the cooler perform overall?

    -The cooler performed surprisingly well for its low price point, keeping mid-range CPUs like the simulated 13600K well within safe temperature limits while maintaining high clock speeds.

  • Did the video reviewer recommend purchasing this cooler?

    -Yes, the reviewer highly recommended purchasing the Dark Rock PX4 cooler immediately before the brand likely increases the price after the video's release, as it offers exceptional value for money at $16.98.

  • What were some of the potential downsides or limitations of the cooler mentioned in the video?

    -The reviewer noted that the fins on the cooler were thin and could be easily bent during installation. Additionally, the cooler's height caused some clearance issues with other components on the test motherboard.

  • How did the cooler's performance compare to other similarly priced options?

    -The reviewer stated that he couldn't imagine any other cooler in this price range performing better than the Dark Rock PX4, calling it the best performing cooler at its price point.

  • What thermal paste was used during the testing?

    -The reviewer used the 1G tube of thermal paste that was included with the cooler, as buying a separate thermal paste would likely cost more than the cooler itself.

  • What were the dimensions and specifications of the cooler mentioned in the video?

    -The cooler dimensions were 152mm height, 120mm fan diameter, and 72mm thickness. It had four copper heat pipes, supported a TDP of up to 200W, and had a fan speed range of 700-1800 RPM.

  • Did the reviewer mention any concerns about the naming similarity between this cooler and Be Quiet's Dark Rock coolers?

    -Yes, the reviewer mentioned being unsure about how the brand was getting away with using a naming scheme similar to Be Quiet's Dark Rock coolers, hinting at the possibility of it being a knockoff or rebrand.

Outlines

00:00

🔍 Discovering Unique PC Gear

The narrator expresses boredom with the current PC industry offerings and decides to explore Amazon for unusual items, a journey that often uncovers unexpected products such as gamer refrigerators, budget-friendly monitors with high gaming specs, mini PCs with decent specs at lower prices, and gamer finger socks. These explorations are teased as future video content. The focus of the current video is the Dark Rock PX4 cooler, priced at $16.98, which raises curiosity about its performance and legality of its name resemblance to a known brand. The video includes a sponsored segment promoting World of Warships, a free-to-play naval strategy game.

05:01

🔧 Unpacking the Dark Rock PX4

The Dark Rock PX4 cooler's design and contents are examined. It features a 120mm fan, supports various Intel and AMD sockets, including the latest LGA 1700, and claims to handle up to 200 watts of TDP. Its construction includes four pure copper heat pipes and promises quiet operation. The cooler comes with a tube of thermal paste, mounting hardware for Intel and AMD, and an instruction manual. The quality and completeness of the included accessories suggest the cooler might offer good value for money, despite its low cost. However, there's skepticism about the actual performance of the thermal paste and the overall build quality of the cooler.

10:02

🛠️ Installation and Initial Impressions

The installation process of the Dark Rock PX4 cooler is described, including adjustments for RAM clearance and fan height. The physical quality of the cooler, particularly the thinness of the fins, suggests a price-appropriate build quality. Initial testing plans include setting the fan to high speeds to assess maximum cooling capability. Observations on the cooler's heat dissipation efficiency are made using thermal imaging, revealing that most cooling occurs at the bottom half of the cooler. This section underscores the practical challenges and considerations when installing and evaluating a budget cooler's performance.

15:02

🌡️ Performance Testing with High-end CPU

The Dark Rock PX4 is tested with a high-end 13900K CPU under various conditions, including stress tests and real-world gaming scenarios. Despite reaching high temperatures during stress tests, the cooler manages to maintain performance without causing throttling, especially when undervolted. The performance in gaming at 1080p and 1440p resolutions is observed, with temperature fluctuations based on CPU load. The cooler's performance suggests it is capable of handling mid-range CPUs effectively, challenging initial expectations given its low price point.

20:03

🏆 Surprising Value of the Dark Rock PX4

Final assessments of the Dark Rock PX4 cooler reveal its remarkable value for money, especially for users with mid-range CPUs. Adjustments to simulate a 13600 CPU show that the cooler can maintain acceptable temperatures under load, highlighting its efficiency. The video concludes with a recommendation to purchase the cooler before a potential price increase due to its unexpected performance. The narrator also reflects on the marketing trend of labeling products as 'gaming' to attract buyers, suggesting skepticism towards such tactics.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Budget Cooler

A budget cooler is an affordable CPU cooling solution, typically priced low for users with limited budgets. The video focuses on the Dark Rock PX4, a $16.98 cooler, which the host aims to test its capabilities and performance, especially for its low price point. Budget coolers allow users to keep costs down while still providing adequate cooling for their systems.

💡Thermal Performance

Thermal performance refers to a CPU cooler's ability to dissipate heat effectively from the processor. The video extensively tests the Dark Rock PX4's thermal performance by running stress tests like Cinebench and monitoring temperatures under different CPU loads and configurations. Evaluating thermal performance is crucial to determine if an inexpensive cooler can handle demanding workloads without throttling or overheating the CPU.

💡CPU Throttling

CPU throttling occurs when the processor reduces its clock speeds and performance to prevent overheating due to insufficient cooling. The host aims to determine if the Dark Rock PX4 can prevent throttling on high-end CPUs like the 13900K, which has a 253W TDP limit. Throttling is undesirable as it negatively impacts performance, so an effective cooler should keep temperatures within safe limits to avoid this issue.

💡Thermal Paste

Thermal paste, also known as thermal compound or thermal grease, is a substance applied between the CPU and the cooler's base to improve heat transfer. The video uses the included 1G tube of thermal paste with the Dark Rock PX4, as buying separate high-quality paste would cost more than the cooler itself. Proper thermal paste application is essential for optimal cooling performance.

💡Heat Pipes

Heat pipes are metal tubes containing a liquid that facilitates heat transfer from the CPU to the cooler's fins or heatsink. The Dark Rock PX4 features four pure copper heat pipes, which are more efficient at transferring heat than traditional solid metal heatsinks. The video demonstrates how heat dissipates along the length of the heat pipes, with more cooling occurring towards the bottom where the pipes make contact with the CPU.

💡Noise Level

Noise level refers to the audible sound produced by a CPU cooler's fan. The Dark Rock PX4 is rated for 22.3 dB(A), which is relatively quiet compared to many other coolers. The host tests the noise levels under different load scenarios, as excessive noise can be disruptive, especially in quiet environments. Balancing cooling performance with acceptable noise levels is essential for an enjoyable user experience.

💡Overclocking

Overclocking involves increasing a CPU's clock speeds beyond its stock settings to achieve higher performance. The video explores the Dark Rock PX4's ability to handle overclocked CPUs by adjusting voltage and core ratios. Effective cooling is crucial for stable overclocks, as higher clock speeds and voltages generate more heat, which can lead to instability or damage if not properly dissipated.

💡TDP (Thermal Design Power)

TDP, or Thermal Design Power, is a specification that indicates the maximum amount of heat a CPU is expected to generate under normal loads. The Dark Rock PX4 is rated to handle up to 200W TDP, which the host tests by configuring the 13900K to match the TDP of lower-end CPUs like the 13600K. Understanding a cooler's TDP rating helps determine its compatibility with different processors.

💡CPU Cores

CPU cores are the individual processing units within a CPU that handle instructions and workloads. The host tests the Dark Rock PX4 by disabling or enabling specific core counts to simulate different CPU models. For example, limiting the 13900K to resemble a 13600K with fewer cores allows evaluating the cooler's performance across various core configurations and power requirements.

💡Resolution

Resolution refers to the display's pixel dimensions, such as 1080p or 1440p. The host tests the Dark Rock PX4 while gaming at different resolutions to observe the impact on CPU temperatures. Higher resolutions tend to be more GPU-bound, reducing the CPU load and, consequently, its heat output. This test helps assess the cooler's performance under various real-world gaming scenarios.

Highlights

The video is about reviewing an inexpensive CPU cooler called the Dark Rock PX4, which costs only $16.98.

The cooler has specifications like a 120mm fan, support for modern CPU sockets, 4 copper heat pipes, and claims to handle up to 200W TDP.

Initial testing with a 13900K at stock settings showed the cooler hitting 100°C under Cinebench stress test, but still providing decent performance for the price.

After undervolting and setting Intel's recommended power limits, the cooler managed to keep the 13900K below 100°C while maintaining high boost clocks.

Real-world gaming tests at different resolutions showed the cooler keeping the CPU in the 70s and 80s Celsius range.

To simulate a mid-range CPU like the 13600K, core counts and power limits were adjusted, and the cooler kept temperatures in the high 70s to mid 80s Celsius.

The reviewer was genuinely surprised by the cooler's performance for its low price and recommended purchasing it before the price inevitably increases.

The cooler's build quality was noted as basic but adequate, with thin fins that could bend easily.

Installation was straightforward, but some clearance issues were encountered due to the cooler's size and motherboard VRM heatsink design.

The included thermal paste was deemed sufficient for a single application, given the cooler's low cost.

The reviewer plans to make future videos exploring other unconventional or budget PC components discovered on Amazon.

The video includes a brief sponsor segment for the game World of Warships.

The reviewer acknowledges that the cooler's naming scheme may conflict with another brand (be quiet!) but does not dwell on the issue.

The cooler's fan has a low advertised noise level of 22.3 dBA at minimum speed.

The reviewer expects the cooler's price to increase significantly after this video, as is typical with budget products featured in reviews.

Transcripts

00:00

so I'm kind of bored like you guys with

00:01

a lot of the stuff going on in the PC

00:02

industry right now so I just started

00:04

perusing Amazon looking for weird things

00:06

and anytime I do that you guys seem to

00:07

enjoy it cuz sometimes we find stuff

00:09

that we never expected like a gamer

00:11

refrigerator a little desk fridge um

00:13

$100 monitor that apparently has really

00:16

good gaming specs part of Amazon basics

00:18

in collaboration with AOC mini PCS that

00:21

actually have pretty decent specs that

00:22

cost a significant amount less than you

00:24

would expect and gamer finger socks

00:28

anyway that's not we're going to talk

00:30

about today these are future videos

00:31

coming up but today we're going to talk

00:32

about this this is the dark Rock PX4 not

00:36

to be confused with be quiet's dark Rock

00:38

I'm not quite sure how they're getting

00:39

away with the naming scheme but I

00:41

digress this is a

00:45

$16.98 cooler what could go

00:54

wrong Hey

00:56

Day d m d

01:02

what we got work to do yeah I'm playing

01:06

World of

01:08

Warships World of Warships is the

01:10

free-to-play naval strategy game where

01:12

you command the most iconic and famous

01:13

warships from World War I and World War

01:15

II recreate it with stunning detail and

01:17

accuracy build your Fleet while

01:18

participating in various game types

01:20

while upgradeing your ship's Arsenal

01:21

along the way new players who sign up

01:23

using my link below we receive an

01:24

exclusive starter pack to get you up and

01:26

running quickly by receiving 7 Days

01:28

Premium Time 1 million credit 300 to

01:30

blooms and the tier five premium ship

01:32

the exitor so what are you guys waiting

01:34

for start sinking ships with World

01:35

warships by heading to the description

01:37

below and getting your

01:42

freebi okay so in terms of specs though

01:45

uh it's 120 mm by 72 x 152 so it's 152

01:48

mm High 72 mm whatever right for the all

01:52

people tend to care about is the height

01:54

it's actually 72 mm thick 120 mm

01:57

diameter so it's a 120 mm fan does

01:59

support l LGA 1700 so that was my first

02:01

concern is like will it work with the

02:03

latest socket also does LGA 1200 115x so

02:07

all the 1150s 1152 1156 amds am5 and am4

02:12

cool it says it can handle 200 watts of

02:15

TDP so we might start with a 13900 K and

02:18

see how it can do and then instead of

02:19

changing like our actual CPU I'll

02:21

probably just turn off cores to

02:23

represent other CPUs believe it or not

02:24

it actually works pretty close that way

02:26

to to figure out what the actual like

02:28

thermal capabilities are

02:30

has four pure copper heat pipes which

02:32

are technically going to be face change

02:34

all heat pipes are face change pipes uh

02:36

or vapor chamber I should say um and

02:38

then the fan speed says 700 to 1800 RPM

02:42

and it's a four four pin pwm 22.3 DB

02:46

that's really low so I'm curious

02:49

accessories included 1 G tube of high

02:51

performance thermal paste back plate

02:53

mounting set for Intel and AMD and a PX4

02:56

manual I'm going to be using the thermal

02:57

paste it comes with the reason for that

02:59

is if you buy any reputable brand

03:01

thermal paste it will probably cost more

03:02

than the cooler itself so we're going to

03:05

see if you were on an extreme budget

03:08

whether or not this

03:10

cooler can get the job

03:12

done it actually doesn't look that bad

03:15

to be honest it actually reminds me very

03:17

close of like the VR V5 cooler that I

03:19

did um also too if you're watching this

03:21

video let me let me tell you right now

03:23

I'm going to be putting the link to this

03:24

down in the cart below or down in the

03:26

description below if you have any

03:28

interest in this cooler and it performs

03:30

even somewhat decent I highly recommend

03:34

you pick one up no it's not sponsored I

03:36

bought it okay we all know after this

03:38

video this will be a $30 cooler we all

03:40

know how it works okay it sucks I can

03:43

only do a video one time like this and

03:44

then the brand goes and screws it up for

03:46

everybody else um and then eventually

03:48

the price will probably come back down

03:50

but for $16 I can't what's the exact

03:52

amount I know it was $16 I want to know

03:54

what the change is cuz I I don't want to

03:56

just randomly say an amount

03:58

$159 it was actually 8% on sale normally

04:01

$17.99 first review a truly impressive

04:04

performance for the price pretty quiet

04:05

and keeps mid-tier CPUs cool they're

04:08

running a 12600 K and it keeps it around

04:10

58c under all course stress test 58c I'm

04:14

going to I'm actually going to call

04:15

maybe shenanigans on that temp I have a

04:17

12900 K and it cools it really fine

04:19

don't need a water cooler does the job

04:21

for me and then another one says screws

04:23

are too big to fit so anyway one person

04:24

is running at 12900 K so I will start

04:26

with a

04:27

13900 uh K and then we'll see like if I

04:30

turn off cores and make it like a

04:32

something like represent maybe like a 13

04:33

700k or something like that we'll see

04:35

what happens silica this is all you get

04:37

in the box so the Fan's already attached

04:39

which is nice and it uses essentially

04:43

identical Clips to how the be quiet

04:46

stuff is like it's identical so I'm

04:49

starting to wonder if this is maybe like

04:51

a odm OEM Rebrand kind of a thing um the

04:56

fans actually the fan actually seems

04:57

like a decent quality the the the cage

04:59

is a little bit on the thin side but it

05:01

actually has rubber mounts um which are

05:03

anti vibration which would be nice the

05:05

screws to mount it down are like

05:09

captured in there with like a cat clip

05:11

they are spring-loaded so you might need

05:14

to remove the fan maybe I don't know it

05:17

seems to accommodate the fan just fine

05:19

you can see it's Offset you can actually

05:21

see how the pipes like Bend like that so

05:23

the fan would go on the Ram side that

05:26

way you're pushing air towards the back

05:27

of the case and your rear fan could pick

05:28

up that heat and just exhausted out the

05:30

back um it's black I don't know if it's

05:32

a Sak coat it could be a sah coat it

05:34

could be a ceramic coat for this price

05:36

it's hard to say I hope it's not just

05:37

paint cuz paint actually could insulate

05:39

and hurt its performance a little bit um

05:42

you can actually see right there um we

05:44

do have the uh four copper heat pipes

05:46

that are exposed copper and they are

05:48

shaved flat and then you have sort of

05:50

the heat sink in between which is kind

05:51

of soldered between the Heat pipes to

05:53

help dissipate heat across the uh IHS

05:55

into the cooler past that the in the uh

05:59

mounting hardware I already talked about

06:02

what it supports these spacers being

06:04

kind of like a baby blue are interesting

06:07

normally these are just

06:09

black um additional Clips so if you want

06:12

to set it up as a push pool that could

06:14

help uh if the fan moves enough air the

06:16

Cooler's not thick enough or dense

06:18

enough to really necessarily need Push

06:20

Pull I don't think adding Push Pull

06:22

would really add to the cooling

06:24

capabilities of it but you never know

06:27

here are the 115x am these These are the

06:30

Intel 11700 these are the Intel brackets

06:35

and then we obviously have pretty

06:37

standard stuff like I have seen these

06:39

exact mounts in a ton of other cooler

06:42

boxes like this looks identical to the

06:44

uh be quiet so I'm starting to really

06:48

wonder if this is literally a knockoff

06:51

of like a like a dark Rock mini kind of

06:53

a

06:54

deal um these are our Intel AMD brackets

06:56

so this is what actually gets mounted

06:58

down onto the

07:00

motherboard and then you can see how

07:01

they have these

07:02

studs not this stud right here it's got

07:06

these studs which is what these threads

07:08

thread down on also too they give you 1

07:10

G of thermal

07:12

paste there's not a lot in here so get

07:15

it right the first time because you all

07:17

know on on 12th gen and up CPUs the IHS

07:20

is pretty big and you can tell by how

07:22

much of the plunger is sticking out

07:23

versus how long the actual tube is that

07:26

less than half of that is filled so you

07:29

need more than an average P size or

07:31

grain of rice these days to clear and

07:33

cover an IHS they do give you a spatula

07:36

too that way you can like spread the

07:38

paste um yeah we'll be maybe I'll show

07:41

you guys once the thermal paste is on

07:43

the CPU before I apply the cooler just

07:44

how much there was prior to uh

07:47

installation so here's the hardware

07:49

installed everything clear so far at

07:50

least on our motherboard this is kind of

07:52

a crowded board with the block and stuff

07:54

here um so you can see it all fits just

07:55

fine doesn't hit any of our standoff or

07:57

not standoff but our caps right here

07:59

should spread just

08:01

fine that's a fair amount of paste

08:03

actually so you definitely will

08:06

get an application out of it not to

08:09

though that's for sure cuz there's not

08:11

much left in there and this might seem

08:14

like an awful lot of thermal paste

08:15

believe it or not

08:17

for a 12300 it's actually not a lot now

08:20

when it comes to trying to spread it it

08:22

definitely feels like a thick cake

08:25

frosting but there's plenty on here and

08:27

yeah it may not look like it's getting

08:29

all all the way to the edges or

08:30

something but it still will spread once

08:32

it's uh down under tension and I still

08:35

have a little bit on the on the spatula

08:37

there at the same time when it gets warm

08:39

it'll get liquidy and then it will sort

08:40

of fill in the gaps a little better what

08:42

I'm going to do is I'm going to put

08:43

another little drop right in the center

08:45

cuz there's still some left and that'll

08:48

help promote some of the spread thermal

08:50

paste applications are not as sensitive

08:51

as people might like to try and make

08:53

them out to be so the orientation you're

08:55

kind of you're not necessarily locked in

08:56

you could rotate it uh if you wanted as

08:59

as long as the overhang as you can see

09:00

there is some overhang here to allow for

09:02

AMD sockets as well if you want to turn

09:04

them so let's say you have a case that

09:06

you need to exhaust out the top or

09:07

something like that um you might have

09:10

some clearance issues with the extra

09:12

width hitting something like over here

09:14

or maybe even interfering with that

09:15

inside stick of ram so I only used two

09:18

sticks of ram in any of my systems so it

09:20

wasn't a problem for this build so as

09:22

you can see I'm going to have I'm

09:23

actually going to have some interference

09:24

right here I actually touched the pace a

09:25

little bit but it hits the fan hits

09:27

right here the cooler clears it but the

09:31

fan is actually hitting it now you see

09:32

how the fan is overhanging down on the

09:34

bottom I can actually just undo these

09:36

clamp these clips and then I can scoot

09:39

the fan up maybe to make it a little bit

09:43

more flush with the

09:46

bottom like that so now we should clear

09:49

it kind of looks stupid hanging off the

09:51

top but this is the thing is really

09:53

tight with this particular type of um

09:56

heat sink for the vrms so now we're down

09:59

so I just wanted to show right there

10:00

this is the kind of stuff that I think

10:02

when you read reviews like on Amazon and

10:04

stuff maybe less experienced Builders

10:06

might just be like oh my gosh it hits

10:08

and then that's it they're like uh they

10:09

don't realize that they can adjust the

10:10

fan height and this is true for almost

10:12

any cooler on this type of motherboard

10:14

it's very unflattering angles is brought

10:15

to you by trying to reach power button

10:17

it's installed you can see it clears the

10:20

GPU and stuff just fine let me try and

10:22

turn it an angle you guys can see so

10:24

that's one of the things some of the big

10:25

coolers have a problem with is they're

10:26

so wide that they interfere with the GPU

10:30

cooler or the GPU if it has a top slot

10:33

that's like real close to the CPU this

10:35

particular board happens to have like a

10:37

half slot thing sort of because of the

10:39

display in between the cooler which

10:41

helps I do wish the cooler was a little

10:43

taller before the the main heat sing

10:45

started cuz then we wouldn't have issues

10:46

with like it hitting on the vrm and

10:48

stuff like that but once I got the

10:49

cooler mounted down I was able to lower

10:51

the fan a little bit so now you can see

10:53

we don't have nearly as much hanging off

10:54

the top I wanted as much air going

10:56

through the fins as possible possible

10:59

now one thing I've noticed is like just

11:01

handling it trying to get it mounted

11:02

down and stuff the fins are really thin

11:03

so it's easy to bend them like I bent

11:05

these over here as you can see The

11:08

Middle's kind of pushed down a little

11:10

bit they definitely feel like you're

11:13

getting what you paid for so I feel like

11:15

if this is a ripoff of like a be quiet

11:17

cooler that they just took the design

11:20

and applied a cheaper material to it

11:21

what I'm going to do right now too

11:22

because I want to know what the maximum

11:24

cooling capability is I'm going to start

11:26

by having the fan profile set to like

11:28

Turbo and then if that's just not enough

11:30

we might just end up going full speed

11:31

the whole time I can feel the air flow

11:34

all the way out here though okay so

11:35

we're on stock out of the box settings

11:37

with XMP profiled for our Ram as you can

11:39

see right now just sitting in the

11:40

desktop our package is at 36 our cores

11:44

are between thir 29 and 35 not terrible

11:49

I did have uh the Nvidia driver

11:51

installing for this GPU I just popped on

11:53

here and you can see that the hottest

11:54

core we got to so far was

11:56

68 uh coup 68 there as well 60 on that

11:59

one not a very heavily multi-threaded

12:02

task obviously I'm going to go ahead and

12:03

just start with C bench I expect this to

12:05

be a disaster I also kind of want C

12:07

bench to heat up that paste and liquefy

12:09

it real quick to get it to spread nicely

12:11

then we'll look at real case real world

12:14

scenarios of like gaming and stuff like

12:16

that and just browsing to see what the

12:18

CPU temperature looks like because cin

12:20

bench is not real world it is a stress

12:22

test on purpose that'll push your CPU

12:24

harder than just about any no average

12:27

consumer sitting at home playing games

12:29

surfing the internet doing documents

12:30

taxes writing doing homework whatever

12:33

surfing browsing getting emails will

12:35

never ever ever see their CPU get pushed

12:37

like cine bench if you're a professional

12:40

you might but you're also not going to

12:41

be buying this cooler if you're

12:42

professional either cuz you already know

12:44

better than to spend that little on a

12:45

cooler so let's go ahead and just start

12:49

multicore and see what happens here

12:51

we're looking here this is what we're

12:52

looking at I'm expecting to see 100 C

12:54

instantly there it is 100 C instantly on

12:58

the package our clock speeds are slowing

13:00

down because of it actually we're at 51

13:03

allore I mean 5'4 allcore is the max

13:06

that we I think 54 is the max we expect

13:08

to see maybe

13:10

55 uh with like aios and stuff it

13:12

dropped down to 5,000

13:14

already but it still gave us a 36,6 A7

13:18

now has it's gimped our performance a

13:19

bit because of the fact that the 100 C

13:22

it pulled 323 Watts that means this

13:25

motherboard is also still pushing the

13:27

CPU farther than it's supposed because

13:29

253 watts is where we're supposed to max

13:31

out so that means the optimized defaults

13:34

for this motherboard are already like

13:35

affecting our performance and that's a

13:37

bigger gripe that we have about the way

13:38

motherboard manufacturers Implement

13:40

their own bio settings on top of the

13:42

Intel recommended so what I'm going to

13:44

do is I'm going to go back into the BIOS

13:46

I'm going to put on the Intel limits and

13:47

see there's 236 252 look at that 8991 90

13:52

so we're not even throttling technically

13:54

we're at 51 gigs which is now

13:57

realistically within the

14:00

so see people see the up to and they

14:03

start to go oh well I'm not getting 5.5

14:05

like it said on the up to out of the box

14:07

but that's 5.5 based on some very

14:09

specific criteria also including

14:11

ridiculous cooling if you can keep it

14:12

down to like 60° under load like a crazy

14:15

water cooling setup or something and you

14:17

get the voltage dialed in just right you

14:19

could probably get that 5.5 on this

14:21

cooler but even the fact that we saw

14:23

5.1 at

14:25

all uh allcore and we did hit 100 C

14:29

right towards the end but look we got

14:31

37,9 so still lower than a 30 13900 K

14:35

should be hitting it should be landing

14:36

around 39,000 or so but again we're on a

14:39

$17 cooler let's keep that in mind so

14:42

real quickly I'm going to do some