This Kills Your Computer.

Austin Evans
3 Mar 202416:47

Summary

TLDRThis video showcases the destructive power of the USB Kill, a device designed to fry electronic gadgets through their USB ports. The host puts various devices, including laptops, game consoles, and smartphones, to the test by connecting the USB Kill, leading to their untimely demise. While some devices demonstrate resilience, most succumb to the lethal surge of power. The host emphasizes the educational purpose of the video, cautioning against attempting such actions and urging manufacturers to enhance USB port protection. Unexpectedly, the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 emerges as the sole survivor, leaving the host both impressed and dismayed at the cost of the experiment, pledging a substantial donation to the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Takeaways

  • ⚡ The USB Kill device is extremely dangerous and can permanently damage or destroy devices by overloading them with power from capacitors when plugged into a USB port.
  • ⚠️ Using the USB Kill to maliciously damage others' devices can lead to severe legal consequences like fines and jail time.
  • 🔍 The USB Kill is intended for defensive purposes, allowing manufacturers to test the robustness of their devices' USB ports and shielding against such attacks.
  • 💥 In the testing, the USB Kill successfully fried numerous devices, including laptops, gaming consoles, and smartphones, with the exception of the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3.
  • 💻 Even rugged and expensive devices like the Dell laptop and PlayStation 5 were no match for the USB Kill's power surge.
  • 🍎 Apple devices, particularly those with Lightning ports, showed some resilience, but the latest M2 MacBook Air's USB-C ports were rendered unusable.
  • 💰 The content creator pledged to donate the value of all destroyed devices to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) as compensation.
  • ⚖️ The video serves as a warning to users about the potential dangers of unknown USB devices and a call for manufacturers to prioritize better USB port protection.
  • 🔒 Manufacturers are encouraged to test their devices with the USB Kill to identify vulnerabilities and implement robust shielding and grounding measures.
  • 🚫 The creator strongly advises against attempting to recreate these tests at home due to the risks involved.

Q & A

  • What is the USB Kill device?

    -The USB Kill is a dangerous device that looks like a regular USB stick but is filled with capacitors. When plugged into a device, it charges the capacitors and then sends all that power back into the device, potentially destroying it.

  • Why does a device like the USB Kill exist?

    -The USB Kill exists primarily for defensive purposes, allowing manufacturers to test the shielding and grounding of their devices' USB ports against such attacks.

  • Is it legal to use the USB Kill on other people's devices?

    -No, using the USB Kill to destroy other people's technology can be illegal. In the video, it's mentioned that someone who used it at a school went to jail and had to pay a $50,000 fine.

  • What is the purpose of testing various devices with the USB Kill in this video?

    -The purpose is to see how far device manufacturers have come in terms of protecting their devices against USB attacks, especially for newer devices with USB-C ports and better shielding.

  • What organization will the host donate to for the value of any devices destroyed during the testing?

    -The host will be making a donation to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which is an organization that does a lot of work around the internet, computers, and devices.

  • Which device surprisingly survived the USB Kill attack?

    -The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 surprisingly survived the USB Kill attack, restarting and remaining functional.

  • What happened to the PlayStation 5 (PS5) after the USB Kill attack?

    -The PS5 initially showed signs of life after the attack but ultimately died completely.

  • How did the iPhone SE fare against the USB Kill?

    -The iPhone SE survived the attack, but its Lightning port no longer functioned, requiring the use of wireless charging.

  • Which device was the only one to survive the USB Kill attack completely unscathed?

    -The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 was the only device that survived the USB Kill attack completely unscathed.

  • What is the host's final message regarding the dangers of the USB Kill?

    -The host's final message is a warning not to trust any USB stick found lying around, as it could be incredibly dangerous like the USB Kill.

Outlines

00:00

⚡ The Dangers of USB Kill: A Destructive Device

This paragraph introduces the USB Kill, a dangerous device that can instantly destroy electronics by sending a high-voltage surge through the USB port. It explains how the USB Kill works, charging capacitors from the USB power and then discharging that power back into the device, potentially causing permanent damage. A warning is given about the illegal and unethical use of this device for pranks or malicious purposes. The purpose of the USB Kill is stated as a defensive tool for manufacturers to test the shielding and grounding of their USB ports against such attacks.

05:02

🔥 Testing the USB Kill on Various Devices

This paragraph describes the process of testing the USB Kill on multiple devices, including a Windows laptop, a rugged Dell laptop, a USB-C charger, a Nintendo Switch Lite, a Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, a PlayStation 5, an iPhone SE, and MacBooks (both old and new). The results are shocking, with the USB Kill successfully destroying most devices, except for the Z Flip 3 and, to some extent, the iPhone SE and the older MacBook Pro. The paragraph highlights the potential for significant financial loss and emphasizes the importance of manufacturers prioritizing USB port protection against such attacks.

10:03

💻 MacBook Air M2: A Glimmer of Hope?

This paragraph focuses on testing the brand-new M2 MacBook Air against the USB Kill. Initially, the MacBook Air appears to survive the attack unscathed, but upon further investigation, it becomes evident that while the system is still functional, all USB-C ports and the MagSafe connector are unable to charge the device. Once the battery runs out, the MacBook Air will be rendered unusable, making it effectively dead. The paragraph highlights the importance of thorough testing and the potential consequences of overlooking USB port security, even in the latest devices.

15:05

🤖 The Unexpected Survivor and a Call to Action

In a surprising turn of events, the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 emerges as the only device to survive the USB Kill attack unscathed. The paragraph expresses disbelief at this outcome and serves as a wake-up call for manufacturers to prioritize USB port security. The video creator pledges to make a substantial donation to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to compensate for the devices destroyed during testing. The paragraph concludes with a stern warning to users about the dangers of unknown USB devices and a plea to manufacturers to take USB port security seriously.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡USB Kill

USB Kill is a dangerous device that looks like a regular USB stick but is filled with capacitors. When plugged into a device, it charges the capacitors using the device's power and then sends that power back into the device, potentially causing severe damage or even complete destruction. In the video, the USB Kill device is demonstrated on various laptops, phones, and gaming consoles, destroying most of them. It serves as a warning about the risks of unknown USB devices and a call for better shielding and protection in USB ports.

💡Shielding

Shielding refers to the protective measures taken to prevent electrical interference or damage to electronic devices. In the context of the video, shielding specifically refers to the grounding and insulation implemented in USB ports to protect against attacks like the USB Kill. The video tests the shielding of various devices by attacking them with the USB Kill, with the intention of highlighting the need for better shielding in USB ports to prevent such attacks.

💡Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is a non-profit organization that defends civil liberties in the digital world. In the video, the host mentions that he will be making a donation to the EFF for the value of any devices destroyed during the USB Kill testing. This is a gesture to support the EFF's work in areas related to the internet, computers, and devices, as well as to acknowledge the destructive nature of the testing.

💡Capacitor

A capacitor is an electronic component that stores electrical energy in the form of an electrostatic field. In the USB Kill device, capacitors are used to store the power drawn from the device's USB port. When triggered, the USB Kill releases this stored power back into the device, potentially causing damage or destruction. The video mentions that the USB Kill contains multiple capacitors, which allow it to store and discharge a significant amount of power.

💡USB Port

A USB port is an interface used to connect various devices, such as USB drives, keyboards, and other peripherals, to a computer or electronic device. In the video, the USB ports of various devices are tested against the USB Kill, which exploits vulnerabilities in the port's shielding and grounding to damage or destroy the device. The video highlights the need for better protection and shielding in USB ports to prevent such attacks.

💡Grounding

Grounding refers to the practice of providing a safe path for electrical currents to flow, typically by connecting a device to the earth or a common ground point. In the context of USB ports, proper grounding helps to protect against electrical surges or discharges, such as those caused by the USB Kill device. The video suggests that many devices may not have adequate grounding in their USB ports, making them susceptible to attacks like the USB Kill.

💡USB-C

USB-C is a relatively new type of USB connector and cable that is smaller and more versatile than traditional USB connectors. In the video, devices with USB-C ports are tested against the USB Kill to see if they are more resilient than devices with older USB ports. The results suggest that while USB-C ports may offer some improved protection, they are still vulnerable to attacks like the USB Kill if not properly shielded and grounded.

💡Prank

A prank is a practical joke or mischievous act, often intended to be humorous or cause minor embarrassment. The video warns against using the USB Kill device as a prank, citing an example of someone who used it at a school and faced legal consequences and hefty fines for destroying school computers. This highlights the serious and potentially illegal nature of using the USB Kill device, even if intended as a prank.

💡Defensive Purposes

The video mentions that the USB Kill device exists for defensive purposes. This means that the device is intended to be used by manufacturers or researchers to test the shielding and protection of their devices against attacks like the USB Kill. By intentionally subjecting their devices to such attacks, manufacturers can identify vulnerabilities and improve their defenses, rather than using the device for malicious or destructive purposes.

💡Manufacturer

A manufacturer is a company or entity that produces or assembles goods or products. In the context of the video, manufacturers refer to the companies that produce electronic devices with USB ports, such as laptops, phones, and gaming consoles. The video serves as a warning to these manufacturers, urging them to take the threat of USB Kill-like attacks seriously and invest in better shielding and protection for their devices' USB ports.

Highlights

USB Kill is a dangerous device filled with capacitors that can destroy electronics by sending a high-voltage surge through the USB port.

Using the USB Kill illegally to destroy other people's technology can lead to severe legal consequences, including fines and jail time.

The USB Kill exists for defensive purposes, allowing manufacturers to test the shielding and grounding of their USB ports against such attacks.

The video demonstrates the devastating effects of the USB Kill on various devices, from laptops to gaming consoles, often completely destroying them.

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 surprisingly survived the USB Kill attack, restarting and remaining functional, despite the USB port being damaged.

The PlayStation 5 initially showed signs of life after the USB Kill attack but ultimately succumbed and died.

The iPhone SE's Lightning port was rendered unusable after the attack, but the device remained functional with wireless charging.

Older MacBook Pro models survived with only the attacked USB port being disabled, while the remaining ports functioned normally.

The brand-new M2 MacBook Air appeared unaffected initially but lost charging functionality through all ports, rendering it unusable once the battery depletes.

The host emphasizes the video's educational purpose, warning viewers not to attempt such attacks and urging manufacturers to improve USB port defenses.

The host plans to donate a substantial sum to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to compensate for the destroyed devices.

The USB Kill's danger lies in its ability to charge capacitors from the USB power and send that power back into the device, potentially causing irreparable damage.

The latest version of the USB Kill (USB Kill 4) can be manually triggered and is even more potent than previous generations.

The USB Kill successfully destroyed various devices, including affordable Windows laptops, a rugged Dell laptop, a USB-C charger, and a Nintendo Switch Lite.

The host emphasizes the importance of not trusting unknown USB devices and urges manufacturers to prioritize USB port protection.

Transcripts

00:00

- This is USB Kill,

00:01

and it is the most dangerous piece of tech that I own.

00:04

Let me show you how it works.

00:05

All right, I'm just gonna plug this thing in,

00:07

we're gonna go for it.

00:09

Simple as that.

00:10

Super, super duper dead.

00:13

So these may look like innocuous USB sticks,

00:16

but inside they are filled with capacitors.

00:18

So this is the V1 that we did a video on

00:20

all the way back in 2017.

00:22

The way this works is that it has

00:23

a bunch of little capacitors

00:24

so when you plug it in it charges those capacitors

00:27

via power from the USB port,

00:29

and then turns around and sends all that power

00:30

directly back into the device,

00:32

in many cases straight up killing it.

00:34

Now before you get any bright ideas

00:36

about how this would be a hilarious prank

00:38

to play on your friends,

00:39

keep in mind that this can actually

00:41

be illegal if you use it

00:42

to destroy other people's technology.

00:44

Someone tried this at a school,

00:46

and killed a bunch of school computers.

00:47

Guess what?

00:48

He went to jail,

00:49

and had to pay like a $50,000 fine.

00:51

Now the reason that a device like this exists

00:54

is purely for defensive purposes.

00:56

So theoretically if you are a manufacturer

00:58

of any number of devices that have a USB port,

01:01

you would buy one of these things to make sure

01:03

that whatever shielding you've done,

01:04

whatever grounding you've done on your USB

01:06

is actually sufficient to support

01:08

protecting against a device like this.

01:10

What I really wanna do is use this newest version

01:13

of the USB Kill on an unfortunate number of devices

01:18

to see exactly how far we've come

01:19

over the last eight years with devices

01:21

that have USB-C, that have theoretically better shielding,

01:24

and how many are going to succumb

01:26

to the most basic looking USB stick you've ever seen.

01:30

So while I hope that most of these devices survive,

01:33

I will be making a donation

01:34

for the value of any devices destroyed

01:36

to The Electronic Frontier Foundation,

01:39

which is a great organization

01:39

that does a lot of work around the internet,

01:41

computers, devices.

01:42

But if I can say anything before I get started it is this.

01:46

Do not try this at home.

01:47

I am doing this testing so that you do not have to.

01:50

And hopefully this video serves as a warning

01:52

not only to you who maybe want to be

01:54

a little bit suspicious of your friend

01:56

walking around with that black USB stick.

01:58

And for manufacturers who watch this video,

02:00

and hopefully decide to put a little bit more effort

02:02

into defending their devices

02:04

against such a simple basic attack.

02:06

Let's give it a try, shall we?

02:09

So our first proper test

02:10

is going to be with a Gateway Windows laptop.

02:13

Now this is significantly newer

02:14

than the Chromebook that we just killed,

02:16

and I will say that while I have low expectations to this

02:19

I'm gonna try something that's a little bit different

02:22

compared to the first generation USB Kill.

02:24

The normal mode you plug it in,

02:25

it charges capacitors and sends it back.

02:27

Because this has a built in battery,

02:28

theoretically I can just trigger it,

02:30

and it would just send that power

02:32

in even to a completely offline device.

02:34

So let's see what happens.

02:36

Here goes nothing.

02:38

So now that it is plugged in

02:39

I'm going to trigger USB Kill.

02:43

(USB Killer clicks) There it went.

02:44

Hear it?

02:45

All right, I'm gonna stop it.

02:46

It will send power for as long as I want via the app.

02:49

So what you just heard, that click,

02:50

that was all that power coming through,

02:52

and likely blowing something on this system.

02:55

So I'm gonna disconnect USB Kill,

02:57

and I am going to try to fire this up.

02:59

Nothing.

03:00

Nothing at all. (cash register dings)

03:01

I mean that's extra scary, if I'm honest with you

03:04

because theoretically you could come back to your computer

03:07

that is completely dead,

03:07

and have no idea what went wrong.

03:10

There's no signs of anything.

03:11

I smelt something for a split second,

03:13

and now it's kind of gone.

03:14

Okay, let's move on to some devices

03:17

that hopefully are a little bit more robust

03:20

than this very affordable Windows device.

03:25

Yikes.

03:26

Next up we have one of the most durable laptops

03:30

I have ever seen.

03:31

I would hope that Dell have put in

03:33

the engineering resources

03:34

to prevent against an attack like this,

03:36

but just because it is physically tough has no bearing

03:39

on whether or not they actually did the work

03:41

to properly ground

03:42

and shield USB ports.

03:43

So let's give it a try.

03:45

So I'm gonna use this in classic mode,

03:46

which means that because the laptop is on

03:48

it should kill it within two seconds,

03:50

or Dell have done a good job of defending it.

03:53

All right, here we go.

03:56

(USB Killer clicks) Ooh.

03:59

And that is dead.

04:00

So that one was extra.

04:02

I heard two cracks.

04:03

It's almost like it pushed through one side,

04:05

and then it went all the way through on the other.

04:07

Wow.

04:08

I mean I can try to get this thing to boot up,

04:10

but that looked...

04:12

Oh no, hell no, dude.

04:13

Extra fried.

04:14

Wow.

04:15

I thought this one actually might have a shot.

04:17

If you wanna see a followup video to this, let me know.

04:20

I might actually try to open some of these up,

04:22

or find someone who can help me

04:23

actually kind of get to the bottom

04:24

of exactly what is dying on these systems.

04:27

But, wow, that is one rugged laptop

04:31

that absolutely no match for the USB Kill.

04:34

That is legitimately terrifying.

04:36

Oh man, this video's gonna get expensive real quick.

04:38

I thought some of these were gonna survive.

04:41

- [Alex] It's for a good cause.

04:42

- It is for a good cause.

04:43

It's all for a good cause.

04:44

The more things that die

04:45

the more money I'm gonna donate.

04:47

But wow, that is okay.

04:50

All right, well let's just keep it on rolling.

04:52

So next I'm gonna do something

04:53

that's very unorthodox.

04:54

I'm gonna try a USB-C charger.

04:57

Now, general word of advice,

04:59

don't trust USB sticks you find,

05:01

and also don't trust random USB ports.

05:03

But I wanna see what happens

05:05

when we connect the USBq Kill to a charger.

05:08

Can someone find the fire extinguisher?

05:10

Why are you the firefighter?

05:12

I don't like this.

05:14

- Well, I like starting the fires.

05:15

- No.

05:16

Okay.

05:17

Again, I will just give you a fair warning,

05:18

do not try this at home,

05:20

we are doing this purely for educational purposes,

05:22

and I mean that.

05:23

I wanna know what happens here.

05:24

Hopefully nothing because there is

05:27

a lot of electronics in something like this

05:28

which is a little GaN charger,

05:30

but let's find out.

05:31

Okay.

05:32

Three, two, one.

05:39

Interesting.

05:40

So what I assume is that if it doesn't detect a signal

05:42

it won't work by default.

05:44

So I'm gonna try manually triggering this now.

05:47

So I'm gonna plug it in again,

05:48

and we're gonna send it.

05:49

Ready?

05:51

(USB Killer clicks) Okay, I heard a click.

05:52

Nothing's on fire.

05:54

So we're gonna unplug that.

05:55

Now I guess let's plug a normal USB into this,

05:56

and see if the charger still functions.

05:59

Absolutely nothing.

06:00

It killed the charger too.

06:01

Oh my God.

06:02

So that's the power of this latest USB Kill

06:06

because previously it only worked

06:08

when you plugged it directly into a device,

06:10

where it would take the power and send it back.

06:11

But because this can be manually triggered,

06:13

and there's also other stuff I didn't get into.

06:15

There's a little magnetic ring

06:17

that you can wipe over this thing.

06:18

You can set programs.

06:19

This thing is ridiculously dangerous.

06:22

It has killed every single thing we've tried.

06:24

Oh my God.

06:26

This one, this one's gonna hurt.

06:28

This is a Nintendo Switch Lite.

06:31

As we all know, the best version of the Switch.

06:34

I have modified this one.

06:36

I did not do a great job with the modifications

06:39

which is why it has been selected

06:40

for this particular excursion.

06:43

Boy, considering that we have killed

06:46

a whole bunch of devices right now,

06:48

my odds of a Nintendo Switch Lite surviving

06:51

are incredibly low.

06:53

So I'm gonna try it in regular mode,

06:55

I think it should just work,

06:56

but if not I will manually trigger it.

06:57

All right, here we go.

06:58

Switch Lite.

07:00

Let's see what we got.

07:03

- [Ken] No.

07:04

- That was the loudest snap.

07:07

Oh my God.

07:07

- [Joanna] That made me sad.

07:09

- That made me sad too.

07:10

I spent a lot of hours on this.

07:11

I, maybe naively hoped,

07:14

that some companies had actually built in some protections

07:17

to try to help defend against this kind of stuff.

07:19

I'm not seeing it at all.

07:20

We have much more expensive items coming up.

07:22

And now I'm like "Do they even have a chance?"

07:25

- [Alex] If you thought that was bad,

07:28

we're gonna have to sacrifice a flippy boy.

07:31

- Oh God.

07:33

This is the part of the video

07:34

that makes me deeply uncomfortable.

07:36

This is a Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3.

07:41

Now because the USB Kill 4 has been

07:44

absolutely destroying everything we've got,

07:46

I actually wanna try,

07:47

before we do that one,

07:48

to go with the original USB Kill.

07:50

So in our first video,

07:51

this one was very dangerous.

07:54

It did actually not kill the USB-C devices.

07:58

At least one of the USB-C devices survived.

08:00

Here goes nothing.

08:00

The USB Kill 1.0, let's give it a try.

08:08

Oh, word.

08:09

Yeah, totally fine, unaffected at all.

08:12

Okay.

08:14

Now let's try with USB Kill 4. (laughs)

08:17

I'm not ready.

08:18

My heart is pounding right now.

08:20

Okay.

08:21

USB Kill 4.

08:22

Let's go.

08:23

Three, (dramatic music)

08:24

two, (dramatic music)

08:25

one.

08:27

(dramatic music)

08:30

Okay.

08:32

That is very promising.

08:33

This is good.

08:34

At least it won't automatically die.

08:36

I'm gonna hit the button,

08:36

I'm gonna see what happens.

08:37

Everyone ready?

08:38

Three, two, one.

08:42

No.

08:47

Oh, it restarted.

08:48

It restarted.

08:52

Oh my God.

08:53

Yes, yes.

08:54

- I love how you just threw it at me.

08:56

Like get away from my Z Flip.

08:58

You like hit me in the face.

09:01

Jesus.

09:03

- Wait, but wait, no.

09:03

Wait, we might have...

09:04

- [Alex] Oh, oh.

09:05

- It did start to boot up,

09:06

and it now is not.

09:07

Come on, come on, come on little Z Flip, you can do it.

09:10

Oh my God.

09:11

Okay, okay, okay.

09:12

We're in here.

09:13

So screen is functional.

09:15

Okay, now let me try to see if power works though

09:17

'cause that would obviously be

09:18

a massive, massive deal if the power no longer works.

09:21

Plug it in.

09:22

Oh my God.

09:23

- [Alex] Wow.

09:25

- I am legitimately impressed.

09:27

- Suck it Jerry Rig Everything.

09:30

- Zach, we love you.

09:31

- Not durable phone my ass.

09:33

(everyone laughs)

09:34

- Let's move on to a device that boy oh boy I hope survives,

09:40

a PS5.

09:41

Now, you might see this,

09:42

and think "Austin, you lost your marbles."

09:44

And to that I would say "Probably if this video

09:46

"keeps going on for much longer."

09:47

So for reference this is a PS5 1100.

09:50

I highly doubt that there's any difference

09:52

between the PS5 models,

09:53

but just so you know PS5 1100.

09:55

So let's plug it into this front USB port,

09:58

and hope, cross your fingers, cross your toes,

10:02

cross your eyes.

10:05

I don't know. (laughs)

10:05

Three, two, one.

10:11

- [Ken] No.

10:12

- Oh my God.

10:14

This one hurts so much.

10:16

I like to remind everyone

10:18

that I will be making a substantial donation to the EFF

10:21

after this video.

10:22

A much more substantial donation than I thought.

10:24

Let's give it a shot.

10:25

Hold on, it might not be dead, dead.

10:27

I'm gonna unplug it for a second.

10:29

Let's see if we can get any signs of life

10:30

out of this guy.

10:31

All right, so let's plug it back in and...

10:34

Oh, it's dead.

10:35

It is dead.

10:36

- [Ken] Oh, oh, oh.

10:37

(gentle music)

10:40

- Okay, I see lights.

10:41

No, it turned off.

10:42

Okay, wait, hold on.

10:42

But that was something.

10:43

No other device has given us a sign of life

10:46

after it completely died.

10:47

Z Flip restarted,

10:48

but this tried for a second.

10:50

Hold on.

10:51

It's probably mortally wounded.

10:53

There are signs of life with this,

10:56

but yikes.

10:58

This is an iPhone SE,

11:00

which is, of course, outfitted with a Lightning port,

11:02

which has traditionally been fairly resistant

11:04

to these kind of attacks.

11:05

And in our original video Apple products

11:07

were fairly durable, right?

11:09

So my hope is that this will survive,

11:12

but theoretically this device was designed

11:16

specially with Lightning in mind.

11:18

Here goes nothing.

11:20

Again, I'll show you it's fully functional.

11:22

In fact, you know what we'll do,

11:23

we'll do something real sad.

11:24

We're gonna record front facing video.

11:28

Okay, let's just really hope

11:29

that this does not work.

11:30

I don't want this to work.

11:32

Three, two, one.

11:36

Ooh.

11:37

Ooh, I heard a click

11:39

and it didn't do anything.

11:39

Let me unplug it right now.

11:40

Whoa, whoa, whoa.

11:42

Oh, well...

11:43

Well hang on.

11:44

Wait, that's good, that's good.

11:45

That's what happened with the Z Flip.

11:46

It triggered and is restarting.

11:49

This looks fine.

11:50

Touch screen is functional.

11:52

Let's see, is our video on there?

11:53

Probably not.

11:54

No, the video didn't save.

11:55

That's fine.

11:56

Let's just make sure that it still accepts power.

11:58

Oh wow, okay.

12:00

So what we have here is a still functional device,

12:02

but a Lightning port which no longer works.

12:05

All right, so I'm gonna put this on,

12:06

my Z Flip is a wireless charger.

12:08

Let's see if it works.

12:09

Okay, it does work.

12:10

So the fact that we have no longer any support

12:13

for our Lightning port to function at all

12:15

is probably gonna be a very expensive repair,

12:17

and yes you can work around with wireless charging,

12:19

but that's still a pretty major downside

12:21

for the device.

12:22

But technically at least it is not completely dead.

12:25

So we'll give that a,

12:27

not a thumb's down,

12:28

a thumb's wiggle.

12:30

A wiggle thumbs.

12:31

So now we're down to MacBooks.

12:35

Plural MacBooks unfortunately.

12:37

This is 2011, I think.

12:40

A 2011 15-inch MacBook Pro.

12:42

So we're just gonna go straight USB-A into it,

12:45

and see what happens.

12:46

I don't think this one's gonna make it.

12:48

Plug it into our MacBook in three,

12:51

two, one.

12:54

(USB Killer clicks) Oh, okay.

12:56

That's very good.

12:57

Very, very good.

12:58

So we heard the click, so it discharged.