"We Don't Know How Long We Have Left" Eric Weinstein On Nuclear Threat To Humanity

Piers Morgan Uncensored
7 Mar 202450:59

Summary

TLDRIn this thought-provoking conversation, Dr. Eric Weinstein, a mathematician and intellectual figure, discusses a wide range of topics, from the complexities of global politics and the potential dangers of AI to the challenges of free speech and the state of academia. He shares his insights on the importance of intellectual diversity, the need for civil discourse, and the critical role of scientific inquiry in understanding our world. Dr. Weinstein also addresses the controversial nature of the 'intellectual dark web' and his views on the current state of higher education, emphasizing the need for rigorous scholarship and academic freedom.

Takeaways

  • 🌐 Dr. Eric Weinstein is a mathematician known for challenging mainstream narratives and is part of the 'intellectual dark web'.
  • 📚 His PhD dissertation on self-dual Yang-Mills equations in higher dimensions was a significant contribution to mathematical physics.
  • 🤔 Dr. Weinstein believes that the intellectual dark web represents a diversity of viewpoints that mainstream media often fails to honor.
  • 🗣️ He emphasizes the importance of civility in debates and the need for better 'fighting' in intellectual discussions.
  • 🌍 Dr. Weinstein discusses the paradox of living in a seemingly peaceful time while facing existential threats like nuclear weapons.
  • 💡 He highlights the potential dangers of AI and the misconceptions about its capabilities, contrasting it with the immediate threat of nuclear weapons.
  • 🚨 Dr. Weinstein expresses concern over the lack of public awareness about the dangers of nuclear weapons and the need to reacquaint society with these risks.
  • 📈 He criticizes the handling of information during the COVID-19 pandemic and the lack of transparency in scientific communication.
  • 🎓 Dr. Weinstein advocates for a return to rigor, scholarship, and collegiality in universities, suggesting a 'civil war' to purge activist subjects.
  • 🚫 He refuses to provide statistical probabilities for events, citing the low quality of such exercises and the potential for misinterpretation on the internet.

Q & A

  • What is Dr. Eric Weinstein's educational background?

    -Dr. Eric Weinstein received his PhD in mathematical physics from Harvard University in 1992. His dissertation was on the extension of self-dual Yang-Mills equations across the eighth dimension.

  • How does Dr. Weinstein view the concept of the 'intellectual dark web'?

    -Dr. Weinstein sees the 'intellectual dark web' as a group of thinkers who challenge mainstream narratives and do not accept everything the mainstream media presents to the public. He emphasizes the importance of civility and intellectual debate within this group.

  • What are Dr. Weinstein's thoughts on the current state of the world in terms of global threats?

    -Dr. Weinstein believes that the greatest threat is the potential for nuclear war, as humanity now has the power to end the human project. He also mentions the importance of understanding the complexities of international relations and the dangers of misinformation.

  • How does Dr. Weinstein feel about the role of free speech in society?

    -Dr. Weinstein supports free speech but acknowledges that there are limits, such as libel laws and export controls. He is concerned about the exploitation of free speech to spread disinformation and personal attacks.

  • What is Dr. Weinstein's perspective on the COVID-19 pandemic and the scientific response?

    -Dr. Weinstein criticizes the scientific community for not being transparent about the origins of the virus and for changing policies without admitting to initial failures. He believes that scientists should be given the freedom to ask questions and seek truth.

  • How does Dr. Weinstein view the role of universities in the current academic and scientific landscape?

    -Dr. Weinstein is critical of universities for prioritizing diversity, equity, and inclusion over academic rigor and scholarship. He advocates for a return to a more traditional academic environment focused on intellectual freedom and collegiality.

  • What is Dr. Weinstein's stance on the use of ivermectin as a treatment for COVID-19?

    -Dr. Weinstein does not fully support his brother Brett's views on ivermectin as a near-perfect prophylactic. He believes that the scientific community should be open to exploring various treatments but also emphasizes the importance of rigorous scientific inquiry.

  • How does Dr. Weinstein describe his Theory of Everything?

    -Dr. Weinstein's Theory of Everything suggests that we live in a 14-dimensional world, with our perceived four-dimensional reality being a projection of this higher-dimensional data. He compares it to playing a record on a phonograph, where the stylus represents Einstein's Space-Time metric and the gramophone is our four-dimensional world.

  • What are Dr. Weinstein's views on the future of science and academia?

    -Dr. Weinstein believes that there needs to be a significant shift in academia to purge it of activist subjects and return to a focus on rigorous scholarship. He sees the need for a 'civil war' within universities to restore academic freedom and intellectual diversity.

  • How does Dr. Weinstein plan to address the issues he sees in academia?

    -Dr. Weinstein plans to use his large following and podcast to amplify voices that need to be heard and to challenge the status quo. He hopes to outlive the current generation of string theorists and promote a more open and ethical scientific environment.

Outlines

00:00

🌟 Introduction to Dr. Eric Weinstein

Dr. Eric Weinstein, a Harvard-trained mathematician, is known for his intellectual contributions across various fields. He is a prominent figure in the 'intellectual dark web,' engaging in debates that challenge mainstream narratives. His expertise spans topics like Putin, Ukraine, globalization, and even Jeffrey Epstein. Dr. Weinstein emphasizes the importance of intellectual curiosity and civil discourse, despite political divides.

05:03

🌍 Global Issues and Personal Struggles

The conversation delves into global issues such as the state of the world, the impact of nuclear weapons, and the anxiety of modern life. Dr. Weinstein discusses the paradox of living in a statistically better time yet feeling angst-ridden. He also shares his personal struggles with dyslexia and how it shaped his intellectual journey. The discussion touches on the importance of civility in debates and the challenges of understanding complex global dynamics.

10:04

🗣️ The Intellectual Dark Web and Nuclear Concerns

Dr. Weinstein reflects on the intellectual dark web's approach to differing political views and the importance of respectful debates. He expresses concern over the potential for nuclear conflict, particularly due to cultural misunderstandings and the complexity of modern game theory. The conversation also explores the role of AI and the potential dangers it poses, compared to nuclear weapons.

15:05

🤔 The Ethics of Nuclear Weapons

The discussion continues with the ethics of nuclear weapons, the potential for misuse, and the need for moral and intelligent stewardship. Dr. Weinstein questions the ability of humans to handle such power responsibly, drawing parallels to the dangers of AI. He also addresses the impact of social media on public perception and the importance of understanding the true nature of scientific advancements.

20:06

🌐 Geopolitical Strategy and Media Influence

Dr. Weinstein critiques the public-spirited fictions perpetuated by Western institutions and the media, arguing that they are not competent or minimal. He discusses the complexities of geopolitical strategy, particularly in relation to Ukraine and Russia, and the lack of transparency in statecraft. The conversation highlights the need for a more nuanced understanding of international relations and the dangers of oversimplification.

25:08

💬 Free Speech and the Role of Wikipedia

The conversation turns to the limits of free speech, the role of Wikipedia as a source of information, and the challenges of disinformation. Dr. Weinstein shares his experiences with Wikipedia edits and the struggle for accuracy. He also discusses the impact of free speech on public discourse, the rise of personal attacks, and the need for a more thoughtful approach to the exchange of ideas.

30:09

🦠 COVID-19 Origins and Scientific Integrity

Dr. Weinstein addresses the debate surrounding the origins of COVID-19, the changing scientific consensus, and the importance of honesty in public health. He criticizes the lack of transparency and the potential geopolitical implications of the pandemic. The conversation emphasizes the need for rigorous scientific inquiry and the dangers of political interference in science.

35:11

🌌 The Theory of Everything and Scientific Ethics

Dr. Weinstein discusses his theory, which suggests a 14-dimensional world underlying our perceived four-dimensional reality. He expresses frustration with the scientific community's resistance to new ideas and the need for a return to rigorous scholarship. The conversation also touches on his plans to use his platform to promote scientific integrity and the importance of academic freedom.

40:11

🎓 The State of Universities and the Future of Academia

Dr. Weinstein calls for a 'civil war' within universities to purge them of activist subjects and restore academic rigor, collegiality, and freedom of speech. He criticizes the current system for promoting intolerance and the need to exclude those who undermine academic integrity. The discussion highlights the importance of adult supervision in academia to ensure the survival of intellectual discourse.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Intellectual Dark Web

A term used to describe a loosely connected group of intellectuals and thinkers who engage in open and often controversial discussions across political divides. In the video, Dr. Eric Weinstein is mentioned as a prominent figure within this group, challenging mainstream narratives and fostering debate.

💡Free Speech

The concept of the right to express one's opinions publicly without censorship or restraint. Dr. Weinstein discusses the limits of free speech, emphasizing that it is not absolute and can be restricted for the public good.

💡Nuclear Weapons

Weapons that derive their destructive force from nuclear reactions, specifically nuclear fission or fusion. Dr. Weinstein expresses concern about the potential for nuclear conflict and the importance of understanding the cultural differences in attitudes towards nuclear weapons.

💡Globalization

The process by which businesses or other organizations develop international influence or start operating on an international scale. Dr. Weinstein touches on globalization as a topic he tackles, likely in the context of its impact on various aspects of society and economy.

💡Dyslexia

A learning disorder characterized by difficulty reading due to problems identifying speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words. Dr. Weinstein refers to his own struggles with dyslexia, highlighting it as a personal challenge that speaks to the triumph of will.

💡Group Think

A psychological phenomenon that occurs within a group of people, in which the desire for harmony or conformity in the group results in an irrational or dysfunctional decision-making outcome. Dr. Weinstein criticizes this concept, advocating for diverse viewpoints and critical thinking.

💡Civility

The state or quality of being polite and respectful in behavior or speech. Dr. Weinstein emphasizes the importance of civility in discussions, suggesting that it is necessary for productive debates and the ability to tease out differences constructively.

💡Yang-Mills Equations

A set of partial differential equations that describe the interactions of elementary particles in the Standard Model of particle physics. Dr. Weinstein's dissertation work on extending these equations across higher dimensions is mentioned, showcasing his mathematical and theoretical physics expertise.

💡Cultural Difference

The variations in customs, traditions, and social behavior among different cultures. Dr. Weinstein discusses cultural differences, particularly between Russia and the West, in the context of nuclear weapons and their use.

💡Public-Spirited Fictions

The concept that certain lies or half-truths told for the greater good or to maintain social order are necessary in governance. Dr. Weinstein criticizes these fictions when they are not public-spirited, meaning they do not serve the common good and are not minimal or competent.

Highlights

Dr. Eric Weinstein discusses the intellectual dark web and its role in challenging mainstream narratives.

Weinstein's views on the potential for nuclear conflict and the cultural differences in perceptions of nuclear weapons.

The importance of civility in debates and the loss of the ability to have constructive disagreements.

Weinstein's perspective on the state of the world, contrasting statistical improvements with widespread anxiety.

His thoughts on the influence of science and the potential dangers of AI becoming sentient.

Weinstein's critique of public-spirited fictions and the lies told by institutions.

His views on the handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and the changing scientific advice.

Weinstein's stance on free speech and its limitations, including the challenges posed by social media.

His thoughts on the role of universities in society and the need for a return to academic rigor and collegiality.

Weinstein's Theory of Everything and his views on the nature of our reality being a 14-dimensional world.

His approach to dealing with the challenges faced by the intellectual dark web and his plans for a podcast to amplify voices.

Weinstein's views on the need for a 'civil war' in universities to restore academic freedom and intellectual honesty.

His critique of the current state of universities and the impact of diversity, equity, and inclusion on academic rigor.

Weinstein's thoughts on the role of social media in shaping public discourse and the quality of debate.

His views on the importance of understanding the complexities of international relations, such as the situation in Ukraine.

Weinstein's perspective on the limitations of free speech and the need for a more nuanced understanding of its role in society.

Transcripts

00:01

Dr Eric Weinstein is a Harvard trained

00:03

mathematician and a Titan of the

00:05

so-called intellectual dark web they're

00:07

the big iconic clastic thinkers who span

00:10

political divides to challenge

00:11

mainstream narratives stoking

00:13

controversy and debate along the

00:16

way Dr Weinstein tackles everything from

00:19

Putin and Ukraine to globalization and

00:21

Jeffrey Epstein's become a superstar

00:23

guest on the world's biggest podcast and

00:25

streaming shows you met Jeffrey Epstein

00:29

the hero from the back of my neck stood

00:31

on end there are people that you need in

00:33

your dark hours and as soon as they

00:35

emerge we tar them with and now he

00:38

goes

00:39

unsensitive I'm always surprised when

00:42

people with your kind of intellect um

00:45

wrestle with any kind of quandry about

00:48

Russian dictator invading Sovereign

00:50

Democratic country powerful Nations like

00:53

Russia have concerns that don't have to

00:56

do only with their exact borders I mean

00:58

do you think anyone like like Putin who

01:00

has 6,000 nuclear weapons at his

01:02

disposal would want to start a war that

01:05

would obliterate everything hand

01:07

somebody a pair of nunchucks uh they're

01:09

most likely to knock themselves out

01:11

rather than to become Bruce Le we sit

01:12

here with a ticking Time Bomb we don't

01:14

know how long we have the four most

01:17

overrated things in life were Lobster

01:20

champagne anal sex and picnics I don't

01:23

really know much about champagne perhaps

01:25

the next question are there any limits

01:28

to free speech it has morphed more into

01:31

a question of what what can I get away

01:34

with that might not be true I've got 10

01:37

things rapid fire no no no yeah I declin

01:40

no I'm I'm quite

01:44

serious Eric wiy great to have you good

01:48

to be with you so I was just checking

01:50

your Wikipedia a minute ago uh and under

01:53

education defaced recently you can

01:56

challenge this if you like but under

01:58

education it said wi te receive his PhD

02:01

in mathematical physics from Harvard

02:02

University in 1992 in his dissertation

02:07

extension of self-dual Yang Mills

02:09

equations across the eighth Dimension

02:12

Weinstein showed that the self-dual Yang

02:14

Mills equations were not peculiar to

02:16

Dimension four and admitted

02:18

generalizations to higher dimensions and

02:20

I realized at that point having read

02:22

that Eric that you and I were probably

02:24

on slightly different intellectual

02:26

Pathways in our lives and this might be

02:29

quite a challenging

02:32

encounter you have a different theory

02:33

about the Yang Mills equation by the way

02:35

that's the most that's the most accurate

02:37

thing I've heard in my Wikipedia entry

02:39

in some time so maybe things are

02:41

improving I mean look obviously you've

02:43

got a massive brain um do you think

02:46

that's been a Force for good or for

02:48

angst in your

02:50

life I see evil isn't on the table um it

02:54

can be I I avoided that yeah yeah yeah I

02:58

mean to be honest uh I hope it's

03:00

inspiring to people with learning

03:03

differences and neurode Divergence

03:05

everywhere I was a terrible student in

03:06

high school um so to me it's quite funny

03:10

I mean I I I don't know what to say it's

03:12

a it's a it speaks to the Triumph of

03:15

Will and the Power of

03:17

Dyslexia the um the intellectual dark

03:20

web as it's called I've interviewed many

03:21

people uh from this Douglas Murray Ben

03:24

of pio Jordan Peterson Professor Steven

03:26

Pinker and so on on the common theme

03:27

seem to be people who just decid that

03:30

they're not going to accept everything

03:32

that the mainstream media pumps out to

03:35

the public they want to challenge uh you

03:38

know what I would call group think they

03:40

want to challenge tribalism certainly

03:42

fueled by social media they just want to

03:44

be I guess annoyingly curious and

03:47

combative about stuff that we're told

03:50

collectively we have to

03:53

believe I think it's a lot more than

03:55

that I mean uh I never explained who was

03:58

in it uh or what it meant so people try

04:01

to wrap ideas around it and one of the

04:03

reasons that it it gained currency was

04:06

that no one had a description for the

04:08

fact that many smart people were not

04:10

going along with the sort of

04:14

intellectual hegemony of the mainstream

04:16

which should represent a huge diversity

04:19

of viewpoints but in fact uh that's only

04:22

honored in the breech uh I think that

04:24

one of the things that is not frequently

04:26

thought about in terms of uh that

04:28

project was the importance of Civility

04:31

it's incredibly difficult to tease out

04:33

our differences when we're yelling at

04:37

each other calling names and in in point

04:41

of fact I believe that we've lost the

04:43

ability to have good fights our fights

04:45

are terrible I totally agree uh we can't

04:48

we can't get good people to sit down

04:50

because without uh intellectual

04:53

Queensbury rules all you get is eye

04:55

gouging and while there's a segment of

04:57

the internet that's always looking uh

04:59

you know for somebody to rip off an arm

05:03

lose a digit um most of us want to live

05:06

to see another day and continue to

05:07

develop our points and even concede when

05:09

the other person has a better one so I

05:11

you know the the the Dirty Little Secret

05:14

of the intellectual dark web is that

05:15

even though we were across the political

05:17

Spectrum we were pretty we were pretty

05:19

darn good to each other for a long time

05:21

and I think that that's the key to

05:22

getting great fights what I've noticed

05:24

is that um Ben Shapiro still has a

05:26

pinned tweet I think facts don't care

05:28

about your feelings

05:30

and I've definitely noticed in debates

05:32

that people go ad hominum very quickly

05:35

and very abusively normally to mask the

05:39

fact that their actual argument is

05:42

devoid of

05:44

fact well when you don't have a point uh

05:47

it's an excellent

05:49

tactic where are we in the world right

05:51

now Eric I mean you you know you've

05:53

you've written and spoken so much about

05:55

the state of the world but you know I

05:57

always say to people that if you

05:59

actually look at it statistically this

06:02

is the best time to ever be alive you

06:04

know we we're living longer we're living

06:05

healthier there's less child poverty the

06:07

a fuel Wars and so on and so on by every

06:10

conceivable metric this is arguably the

06:13

best time to ever be alive and yet so

06:15

many people seem so angst-ridden you

06:17

know young people have an epidemic of

06:19

anxiety um a lot of people having real

06:22

problems just dealing with life when in

06:24

fact compared to all their ancestors

06:27

they've got it good why

06:30

why well see I you've got to stop

06:33

drinking uh with Stephen pinkler picker

06:36

I think uh hey was that see him that

06:37

said that you're right yeah yeah uh well

06:41

this is a terrible idea that was spread

06:42

by Stephen Pinker um and what it is you

06:45

know to to borrow from my physics and Ma

06:48

and math background is uh you can't

06:52

understand the conservation of energy if

06:54

you don't have terms for both potential

06:56

and kinetic energy so if you think about

06:58

what you're talking about you're talking

07:00

about the cessation of all kinds of in

07:02

some sense human kinetic energy from the

07:04

early part of the 20th century with all

07:06

of the you know two two terrible Wars a

07:09

horrible pandemic Etc uh we don't see

07:12

that much in the world only Ma's grap

07:15

Leap Forward I think Rises to that level

07:17

of

07:18

atrocity um so that has been a huge

07:20

Improvement the problem is why that is

07:23

the case which is largely because in

07:26

1952 53 over six months we acquired ired

07:30

the secrets to both the atom and the

07:33

cell um so with the first Hydrogen Bomb

07:36

named Ivy Mike in the Pacific and Watson

07:38

and cric's elucidation of the double

07:40

helix structure for nucleic acid uh we

07:43

became Godlike in terms of our power and

07:46

as a result we acquired the first time

07:50

uh for the first time the ability to end

07:52

the human project and I think it's the

07:54

loss of an indefinite human future uh

07:56

future that has to be restored and no

07:58

one can figure out how to do it so we

08:00

sit here um effectively uh with a

08:03

ticking Time Bomb we don't know how long

08:05

we have and uh things are very pleasant

08:09

I mean you can you can uh sit in a

08:11

coffee shop and um have a have a

08:14

perfectly good life uh but you never

08:16

know when the end is coming whereas in a

08:18

previous era you didn't know how often

08:20

you were going to be you were going to

08:21

be conscripted into a war but on the

08:24

other hand uh there was no chance of

08:26

humans extinguishing themselves so I

08:27

think you really have to to broaden that

08:30

concept and I would agree with you in

08:31

terms of the

08:32

realized um Terror uh that has engulf

08:37

the world in fact most of it is

08:39

potential Terror did you watch oppenheim

08:41

in the movie sure what did you think of

08:46

it it's very tough

08:49

um I don't think people

08:52

remember that we have this power and

08:56

that it was Unleashed by science and in

08:58

particular it was Unleashed

08:59

by effectively my former colleagues um

09:04

so that you know when you see a cameo

09:06

appearance by Richard Fineman let's say

09:08

uh or at least you know someone uh

09:11

portraying him uh you have to recognize

09:14

that these are the people who

09:16

unleashed the uh the Doomsday scenario

09:19

and for me because we ceased exploding

09:24

atmospheric nuclear weapons in 1962 I

09:27

believe uh We've really grown far too I

09:32

don't know how to say it we we're too

09:34

unconcerned with the danger in which we

09:37

live and for me it was an attempt to

09:40

reawaken our self- knowledge and to

09:43

remind ourselves how important science

09:46

is how how you know currently we we say

09:48

that scientists are feeble they don't

09:50

live in the real world and I promise you

09:52

uh you'll be living in their world uh

09:55

for the rest of for the rest of time

09:57

this is very much the real world and it

09:58

was it it was painful in part but it was

10:00

a very intriguing film I mean when

10:03

Vladimir Putin rattles his his nuclear

10:07

saber um which he does regularly as a

10:10

form of trying to intimidate the West in

10:12

particular do you think he means it I

10:14

mean do you think anyone like Putin who

10:17

has 6,000 nuclear weapons at his

10:19

disposal is ever I don't know whether

10:22

the St stupid isn't the right word is is

10:25

ever going to be in a position where he

10:27

would want to start war that would

10:29

obliterate

10:32

everything you can ask the same of us

10:36

yeah but I'm I'm I'm quite

10:39

serious the

10:41

um in terms of a cultural difference the

10:44

Russians regularly use nuclear uh

10:47

explosions for engineering purposes they

10:50

have a comfort with nuclear weapons that

10:52

we lack I think that many Americans do

10:55

not really understand the cultural

10:56

difference between Central and Eastern

10:58

Europe and the modern

11:00

West um which is you know frankly

11:03

terrifying I I really I see

11:05

cross-cultural

11:07

miscommunication as a potential start to

11:09

a nuclear uh nuclear scenario and as

11:12

we've seen from the Cold War there have

11:14

been many situations in which uh if

11:16

there's a glitch in a system and you

11:18

believe that somebody is uh firing upon

11:21

you that uh you're forced to make a very

11:24

tough decision quite honestly humans are

11:26

just not good enough to play this kind

11:29

of game theory and remember that with

11:31

the Cold War it was basically a bipolar

11:34

conflict you're about to move to

11:35

multi-polar Game Theory and I can assure

11:39

you that it's a much less stable

11:41

scenario where you're trying to figure

11:42

out what eight different players are

11:43

doing with regional conflicts and

11:46

unannounced nuclear Powers uh entering

11:49

the frame do you worry more about

11:51

nuclear Armageddon or AI becoming

11:55

sentient I worry about people trying to

11:58

to make AI a more pressing problem than

12:02

nuclear weapons a lot of the cool kids

12:04

in Silicon Valley have developed a meme

12:06

which is that oh AI is far more

12:09

dangerous than

12:10

nukes and that may be in the long run

12:14

but at the moment it's not even it's not

12:16

even close however it feels kind of P to

12:19

worry about nuclear weapons five years

12:21

ago or so I think I started publicly

12:23

calling for rare atmospheric tests of

12:26

nuclear weapons uh because I think the

12:28

greatest danger at the moment is that

12:31

fear of nuclear weapons is seen as out

12:33

of Vogue and we have to reacquaint our

12:36

our viscera with the danger in which we

12:39

live I mean I I did the last interview

12:41

with Professor Steven Hawking before he

12:43

sadly died and I asked him what's the

12:45

biggest threat to Mankind and he said

12:47

when artificial intelligence learns to

12:49

self-design the implication being that

12:51

when it does the first thing it would do

12:53

is probably conclude that humans are

12:55

completely pointless and irrational and

12:58

useless in many cases and they just get

13:00

rid of

13:02

us I don't think that's his best

13:07

work really you're you're not as

13:11

concerned well in the long run I think

13:13

that uh it's a huge concern but if you

13:16

look at what large language models are

13:19

and how quickly humans have confused

13:21

large language models for general

13:24

intelligence uh it tells you that maybe

13:26

more humans need to spend time C and

13:29

understanding the Transformer

13:30

architecture which enabled this uh

13:32

recent mini Revolution I mean it's

13:34

absolutely astounding but mostly what

13:36

these machines are doing are feeding us

13:39

back to us and once they've read all our

13:41

books and read all our papers uh it may

13:44

quite it's easily possible that this

13:47

model and this architecture May Plateau

13:50

but isn't it the same kind of situation

13:52

with nuclear weapons where in you know

13:55

decent hands supposedly decent hands of

13:59

people who have a moral code a code of

14:02

ethics who don't want to do the wrong

14:04

thing um nuclear weapons uh can be

14:07

controlled and can be safe but in

14:09

nefarious hands from people with evil

14:12

intent they become incredibly dangerous

14:14

and I I would say it's the same argument

14:16

with AI isn't

14:19

it I don't agree with the premise so

14:22

maybe ask that to someone else I believe

14:24

that if you take uh 10 very moral people

14:28

and very intelligent people and you give

14:30

them all nuclear weapons and the ability

14:32

to annihilate each other you can play

14:33

all sorts of game theoretic experiments

14:36

and find that we're simply not wise

14:38

enough to solve coordination problems

14:41

and signaling problems I I I I just

14:44

don't agree with this idea that it's our

14:46

morality and our intellect which makes

14:49

nuclear weapons dangerous it is simply

14:52

the power it's like handing a a

14:54

lightsaber to somebody in a Star Wars

14:57

film and uh you know watching them learn

15:01

U by slicing off you know a leg and an

15:03

arm within the first five minutes hand

15:05

hand hand somebody a pair of nunchucks

15:07

uh they're most likely to knock

15:09

themselves out rather than to become

15:10

Bruce Lee yeah but if you have Mother

15:12

Theresa with her finger on the nuclear

15:14

button and Adolf Hitler the chances are

15:16

more likely that it'll be the bad guy

15:19

that presses

15:21

it uh you took two people uh one is much

15:26

worse than the other but those aren't my

15:27

favorites uh

15:29

Mother Teresa I don't I we don't need to

15:31

relitigate the Christopher Hitchens

15:33

point I would say that um I just don't

15:37

know of of these good people who can

15:41

Steward nuclear weapons uh I it's simply

15:45

too much

15:46

power one of your or if you think about

15:48

it in terms of systems uh a democracy is

15:51

capable of having a string of uh you

15:54

know 10 moral ethical leaders and then

15:57

it gets itself into a period of distress

15:59

and suddenly it elect somebody who's

16:01

completely unfit for the office we we

16:03

don't have the ability to live with this

16:06

this amount of Leverage I had a a good

16:08

relationship with Christopher Hitchens I

16:09

employed him actually as a columnist

16:11

when I was editor of Daily Mirror and he

16:13

once sent me one of my favorite emails

16:15

ever which was he said the four most

16:17

overrated things in life were Lobster

16:20

champagne anal sex and

16:25

picnics

16:27