Is Overclocking now useless?

JayzTwoCents
22 Mar 202417:18

Summary

TLDRThe video discusses the concept of overclocking and its diminishing relevance in modern computing, particularly for high-end CPUs and GPUs. It explains how manufacturers like Intel and AMD have pushed their components to the limit, leaving little room for users to overclock. The video also touches on the evolution of GPU boost technologies and the challenges in achieving significant overclocks. It concludes by highlighting the importance of cooling solutions for managing the power demands of contemporary hardware.

Takeaways

  • 🚀 Overclocking modern CPUs and GPUs is less about pushing beyond rated speeds and more about achieving advertised speeds sustainably.
  • 💻 The concept of overclocking being 'dead' refers to the reduced headroom for manual overclocking due to manufacturers pushing components close to their limits out of the box.
  • 🎮 High-end gaming PCs from companies like Falcon Northwest focus on providing a true high-end experience with custom cases and rigorous testing.
  • 🔧 Achieving the full advertised performance of a CPU now almost feels like an overclock due to the power and thermal limits set by manufacturers.
  • 🌡️ Factors like thermal headroom, power limits, and power draw play crucial roles in determining the achievable clock speeds of CPUs and GPUs.
  • 💡 Modern CPUs, like the Intel 14900 K, can achieve high single-core and all-core speeds, but sustaining these at 100% load can be challenging due to power and thermal constraints.
  • 🛠️ Overclocking tools like Intel's Extreme Tuning Utility (XTU) allow for on-the-fly adjustments to performance parameters within the operating system.
  • 🔥 ASIC quality becomes significant when trying to undervolt and overclock CPUs for better performance without excessive power draw or temperature increases.
  • 🎲 The difficulty in achieving significant overclocks on GPUs has led to a focus on taming the power and heat output of high-end components.
  • 💻 The script suggests a resurgence in interest for water cooling due to the power demands of modern high-end CPUs and GPUs, making it relevant again for cooling solutions.

Q & A

  • What is the main topic discussed in the transcript?

    -The main topic discussed in the transcript is the concept of overclocking, its relevance in modern computing, and the challenges involved in achieving stable overclocks with current high-end CPUs and GPUs.

  • What does overclocking mean in the context of the transcript?

    -In the context of the transcript, overclocking refers to the practice of pushing computer components, such as CPUs or GPUs, beyond their rated speeds to achieve higher performance.

  • Why is achieving stable overclocks difficult with modern components?

    -Achieving stable overclocks is difficult with modern components because manufacturers are already pushing the components close to their limits out of the box, leaving little headroom for further overclocking. Additionally, the power and thermal constraints of these components make it challenging to sustain higher clock speeds without risking instability or damage.

  • What is the significance of the 5.5 GHz clock speed mentioned in the transcript?

    -The 5.5 GHz clock speed mentioned in the transcript is significant because it represents a high-performance target for modern CPUs. It is an example of the rated speed that some CPUs claim they can achieve, but in reality, sustaining this speed under full load can be difficult due to power and thermal limitations.

  • What is the role of power limits in the overclocking process?

    -Power limits play a crucial role in the overclocking process as they determine the amount of power that can be supplied to the CPU or GPU. Higher power limits can allow for higher clock speeds, but they also increase temperatures, which can lead to stability issues if not properly managed with adequate cooling solutions.

  • How has the practice of overclocking evolved over the years?

    -Overclocking has evolved from a practice where enthusiasts could push their CPUs and GPUs significantly beyond their rated speeds to a more challenging endeavor where manufacturers have already optimized performance out of the box, leaving little room for further manual overclocking. The focus has shifted from achieving higher clock speeds to managing the power and thermal demands of high-performance components.

  • What is the significance of the core clock speed in CPUs and GPUs?

    -The core clock speed in CPUs and GPUs is a measure of the frequency at which these components operate. Higher clock speeds generally result in better performance, but as the transcript discusses, achieving and sustaining these higher speeds, especially under load, has become more difficult with modern components due to their power and thermal constraints.

  • What is the role of voltage in the overclocking process?

    -Voltage plays a critical role in overclocking as it directly affects the performance and stability of the CPU or GPU. Increasing the voltage can allow for higher clock speeds, but it also increases power draw and heat output, which must be managed carefully to avoid damaging the components.

  • Why is undervolting a CPU or GPU important in the context of the script?

    -Undervolting a CPU or GPU is important because it allows for the reduction of power draw and heat output without significantly impacting performance. This can lead to more stable and efficient operation, especially when trying to achieve sustained high-performance levels or when working with the limitations of a specific cooling solution.

  • What is the impact of GPU Boost and similar technologies on the overclocking landscape?

    -GPU Boost and similar technologies have automated the overclocking process for GPUs, allowing them to automatically adjust clock speeds based on temperature headroom and power limits. This has reduced the need for manual overclocking and has made it more challenging for users to achieve significant performance gains beyond the factory settings.

  • What is the significance of water cooling in the context of high-end CPUs and GPUs?

    -Water cooling is becoming increasingly relevant for high-end CPUs and GPUs due to the high thermal and power demands of these components. As manufacturers push the performance limits, traditional air cooling solutions may not be sufficient, making water cooling a more effective option for managing the heat output and maintaining stable operation at high clock speeds.

Outlines

00:00

🚀 Overclocking and Modern Hardware Capabilities

This paragraph discusses the concept of overclocking and its relevance in today's computing environment, focusing on modern CPU and GPU components. It highlights the capabilities of high-end custom gaming systems from Falcon Northwest, emphasizing their state-of-the-art testing and design for optimal performance. The discussion includes the technical aspects of overclocking, such as pushing ASICs beyond their rated speeds, the importance of thermal headroom, and power limits. It also touches on the evolution of CPU clock speeds and the challenges of achieving advertised performance levels due to power and thermal constraints.

05:00

🔧 The Reality of Overclocking in Current Hardware

The paragraph delves into the practical challenges of overclocking modern components, such as the Intel 14900 K CPU. It explains how achieving the advertised clock speeds often requires manipulating system settings, as the hardware is already pushed to its limits out of the box. The discussion includes the use of Intel's Extreme Tuning Utility (XTU) and the impact of power limits on achieving sustained performance. The paragraph also addresses the quality of the ASIC and the role of voltage management in achieving stable overclocks, highlighting the diminishing returns of traditional overclocking methods in the face of power and thermal constraints.

10:02

🌡️ Balancing Frequency, Voltage, and Stability

This section explores the relationship between frequency, voltage, and stability in overclocking. It describes attempts to achieve higher clock speeds by adjusting voltage offsets and monitoring temperature limits. The importance of maintaining stability under extreme workloads is emphasized, as well as the diminishing benefits of undervolting and overclocking in the context of modern hardware. The paragraph also reflects on the historical significance of overclocking and how it has evolved from a method of significantly increasing performance to a more nuanced approach focused on managing power-hungry and thermally demanding components.

15:03

💡 The Changing Landscape of Overclocking

The final paragraph discusses the shifting landscape of overclocking, particularly in the GPU market. It contrasts the past practices of significant frequency increases with the current reality where GPUs automatically overclock to their limits. The paragraph explains how manufacturers like NVIDIA and AMD have incorporated features like GPU Boost and Precision Boost Overdrive that reduce the need for manual overclocking. It also touches on the resurgence of water cooling due to the power and thermal demands of high-end CPUs and GPUs, and the author's intention to focus on water cooling projects in response to these demands.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡overclocking

Overclocking refers to the practice of increasing the clock speed of a hardware component, such as a CPU or GPU, beyond its factory-set limits to achieve higher performance. In the context of the video, the speaker discusses the diminishing returns and challenges of overclocking modern components, as they are already optimized and pushed to their limits out of the box.

💡CPU

A CPU (Central Processing Unit) is the primary component of a computer that performs most of the processing inside the computer. The video discusses the various core counts and clock speeds of modern CPUs, and how these have increased over time, making overclocking less necessary for achieving high performance.

💡GPU

A GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is a specialized electronic circuit designed to rapidly manipulate and alter memory to accelerate the creation of images in a frame buffer intended for output to a display device. The video touches on the topic of GPU overclocking and how it has changed over time, with features like NVIDIA's GPU Boost and AMD's Precision Boost Overdrive.

💡thermal headroom

Thermal headroom refers to the difference between the current temperature of a component and its maximum safe operating temperature (TJ Maxx). In the context of the video, it's crucial for stable overclocking, as pushing components beyond their thermal limits can lead to throttling or even damage.

💡power limit

The power limit refers to the maximum amount of power that a hardware component, such as a CPU or GPU, is designed to consume. In the video, the speaker talks about how modern components have power limits that are pushed to their extremes, leaving little room for additional overclocking without risking instability or damage.

💡Falcon Northwest

Falcon Northwest is a company that specializes in building high-end custom gaming PCs. In the video, the speaker mentions Falcon Northwest as an example of a company that has been providing custom gaming systems for over 30 years, emphasizing their focus on high-end gaming experiences and rigorous testing to ensure optimal performance.

💡ASIC

An ASIC (Application-Specific Integrated Circuit) is a microchip or integrated circuit designed to perform a specific task, as opposed to a general-purpose processor. In the context of the video, the term is used to refer to any component with a core clock, such as a CPU or GPU, which can be overclocked.

💡TDP

TDP stands for Thermal Design Power, which is the amount of heat generated by a component, used to determine the cooling requirements of a system. The video discusses how modern CPUs and GPUs have high TDPs, indicating their power consumption and heat output, and how this affects the need for efficient cooling solutions.

💡voltage

Voltage refers to the electric potential difference between two points. In the context of the video, it relates to the amount of voltage being sent to the CPU or GPU, which directly affects their performance and power consumption. Overclocking often involves adjusting voltage to achieve higher clock speeds while maintaining stability.

💡stress test

A stress test in the context of hardware performance is a series of computational tests designed to push a component to its limits and evaluate its stability and performance under extreme workloads. The video emphasizes the importance of stress testing in determining whether an overclock is stable and can handle heavy computational demands without crashing.

💡water cooling

Water cooling is a method of cooling where heat is transferred from the heat source to a liquid, typically water or a water-based coolant, which then circulates through a loop to a radiator where the heat is dissipated into the air. The video suggests that water cooling is becoming more relevant due to the high power demands and thermal output of modern CPUs and GPUs.

Highlights

The concept of 'overclocking being dead' is discussed in the context of modern CPU and GPU components.

Falcon Northwest has been building high-end gaming PCs for over 30 years, focusing on custom cases and rigorous testing for optimal performance.

Overclocking involves pushing an ASIC beyond its rated speeds, applicable to CPUs, GPUs, and even Raspberry Pi.

Modern CPUs have varying clock speeds and core counts, with high-end models advertising speeds up to 5.5 GHz or more.

Achieving advertised clock speeds often requires manipulating power and voltage settings, as components are pushed to their limits.

The 14900 K CPU is demonstrated to run at 253 Watts, reaching its max power rating, but not sustaining the advertised all-core speed of 5.5 GHz.

Motherboard manufacturers are criticized for lifting power limits out of the box, which can lead to higher temperatures and potential performance issues.

Overclocking has evolved from pushing beyond specified speeds to trying to achieve and sustain advertised speeds under load.

The quality of the ASIC plays a role in how much voltage can be reduced while still achieving high clock speeds.

The importance of achieving advertised speeds for sustained periods is emphasized over the traditional concept of overclocking.

GPUs have built-in features like NVIDIA's GPU Boost and AMD's Precision Boost Overdrive that allow for automatic overclocking out of the box.

The fun of tinkering and overclocking has been diminished as manufacturers push the limits out of the box, leaving little room for user adjustments.

The focus is shifting towards managing the power and heat output of high-end CPUs and GPUs, making water cooling more relevant.

The high-end CPU and GPU market demands more power and cooling solutions, with some CPUs exceeding 300 Watts and GPUs over 600 Watts.

The video discusses the practical challenges and diminishing returns of overclocking in the current landscape of high-performance computing.

Transcripts

00:00

you know there's this concept of

00:01

overclocking being dead that I sort of

00:02

want to talk about um it's partially

00:04

true but we we're we're going to talk

00:06

about modern CPU components even GPU

00:08

components and whether or not like

00:10

overclockability is something you should

00:12

even care about

00:13

anymore for those looking for a high-end

00:16

custom gaming experience look no further

00:17

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00:19

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00:21

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00:25

available only through Falcon Northwest

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feature state-of-the-art testing and

00:28

design to ensure that every component is

00:30

performing at their best through thermal

00:32

imaging and rigorous lab testing

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designed and overseen by the Falcon

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00:51

so all overclocking means is pushing an

00:53

Asic Beyond its like rated speeds so an

00:57

aset could be anything it could be a CPU

00:58

it could be a GPU it could be a

01:00

Raspberry Pi right it could literally be

01:01

anything anything that has a core clock

01:03

um so our CPUs as you know have all

01:05

sorts of varying clock speeds these days

01:07

and there's like single core there's two

01:09

core there's like three core six core

01:12

eight core and what I mean by that is

01:13

that's the amount of cores under load

01:15

that determine the speed so that's why

01:17

every single CPU that you look at now

01:18

says up to 5.5 GHz or up to 5.8 GHz

01:22

because there's a very strict set of

01:25

criteria that has to be met to be able

01:26

to get that clock speed is there thermal

01:29

Headroom are you anywhere near your your

01:31

TJ Maxx on temperature uh what is your

01:33

power limit what is your power draw it's

01:35

like power draw would be things like how

01:36

many amps is it actually drawing through

01:38

the CPU how how much voltage is being

01:40

sent to the GPU how hot's the GPU so all

01:43

these things play into a factor when it

01:45

comes to your clock speeds now the thing

01:48

is with modern modern components being

01:50

pushed as far as they're being pushed

01:52

today like 5 GHz was a pipe dream 5

01:54

years ago like 5 years ago sure you

01:55

might have you might have had a 9900 K

01:57

here and there that could hit like 5 GHz

01:59

it's maybe all core maybe and then

02:02

really good chips might be able to do

02:03

like 5 one single or dual core load now

02:07

we're talking like 58 or 14900 K is

02:10

doing like 5,800 MHz single core and two

02:13

core load and then up to 5.5 gahz all

02:16

core that's like completely unheard of

02:18

but one of the ways that they've

02:19

achieved that is the fact that they have

02:21

to push the power limits kind of to an

02:23

insane envelopes so for instance the

02:25

14900 K which I have installed on my

02:27

test bench right here on an Asus

02:31

uh board I don't remember which one it

02:33

is exactly I really don't remember which

02:35

one it is it says up to 5.5 GHz but it

02:37

run it's at 253 Watts now what I'm going

02:40

to show you here real quickly real quick

02:41

and we'll kind of do some demonstrations

02:43

here of of how to get the full

02:45

advertised performance out of your CPU

02:47

because essentially it's almost like an

02:49

overclock now to get the advertised

02:51

speeds which is really stupid and should

02:54

border on marketing legality at this

02:57

point um you can see right here we have

03:00

a couple cores that are sitting in the

03:02

5.8 GHz range there's one right there

03:04

there's one right there it's going to

03:05

hand off to down there watch see that

03:07

went 55 back and so Core 2 and three in

03:10

the P core Arrangement tend to be the

03:12

preferred cores for the higher clock

03:13

speeds all the e cores as you can see at

03:16

4.3 now realistically what should happen

03:19

here is when I start cinebench we should

03:21

see it go to 5.5 GHz all core the

03:24

problem is what we're going to find is

03:25

that getting 5.5 GHz all core at a full

03:29

100% % sustained load is not what you're

03:31

going to get you're going to get like 52

03:33

51 so check this out we don't care about

03:36

our score and stuff right now on sbench

03:37

I'm just using this as a benchmark to

03:39

load up the CPU so right now we'll look

03:41

at the scores to compare but I don't as

03:43

as I hit start on allore test or

03:45

multicore you're going to see 55 on all

03:48

cores now 5'2 it dropped like we got

03:50

like three or four seconds of 5.5 GHz

03:54

and what sucks about that is that's all

03:56

that was basically required for Intel's

03:57

up to 5.5 GHz to really legal so our

04:01

power shoots right up to

04:04

253 XX watts and that's exactly what

04:07

it's max power rating is now that's why

04:10

we're not actually able to get 55 on all

04:12

cores sustained is because there has to

04:15

be a limiting factor there's there is a

04:17

throttle reason yes right now if I was

04:19

to bring up XTU or extreme tuning

04:20

utility uh from Intel it would have a

04:23

throttle reason of yes as power power

04:26

would be our limiting factor here so

04:28

what a lot of motherboard manufacturers

04:29

are doing is they're lifting up those

04:31

power limits out of the box I've already

04:32

done a complete rant video explaining

04:34

that it motherboard manufacturers need

04:36

to leave Intel limits in place unless

04:39

the user goes in and specifies lift

04:41

those limits because the cooler has

04:43

everything to do with how well it can

04:46

perform cuz the problem is when you lift

04:48

the power what do you do you also lift

04:50

the temperatures what's essentially

04:52

become

04:53

overclocking these days is not pushing

04:56

the core necessarily Beyond it rated

05:00

spef or specified speeds which is the up

05:03

to 5.8 single core and up to 5.5 GHz all

05:06

core on a 49 or 4900 K it's just trying

05:10

to manipulate the specs to get the

05:13

advertise speeds sustained so let's do

05:16

this I'm going to go ahead and load up

05:17

XTU I love XTU because it allows me to

05:19

make these changes on the fly in the OS

05:21

so right now what I want to see is can I

05:23

even come close to getting Beyond 5.5

05:28

GHz all core

05:30

and I'm not entirely so sure because

05:33

components are pushed so close to the

05:35

Limit these days with that you know well

05:38

over well into the 5 GHz range even the

05:40

AMD and that's a AMD rig behind me with

05:42

a I don't remember which CPU is on there

05:43

but it's an AMD system right there even

05:45

with amds Precision boost overdrive and

05:47

stuff it's very difficult to get the

05:49

advertised speeds for very long and even

05:51

those CPUs are up into the 5 GHz plus

05:53

range now which is huge for AMD they

05:55

were lacking in the clock speeds for so

05:57

long and they've definitely caught up

05:58

into that 5 gz race so here's our multi

06:00

our performance core ratio multiplier 55

06:02

so it's that times 100 how we get the

06:04

5500 and then the efficiency core at 4.3

06:07

now what I'm going to do right now is I

06:09

actually have to go

06:11

into you know what I'm going to click

06:13

automatic overclock and see what happens

06:15

I haven't done this in a

06:17

while let's just see if it actually does

06:20

anything

06:22

useful okay so it lifted at 100 MHz on

06:25

each and lifted the offset by 20 molts

06:28

well the attemp went to 9 DC immediately

06:30

there's 55 all core now we drop 54 hey

06:34

it's actually doing something look at

06:35

our TDP right there 330 WTS 903c on the

06:38

core and we are getting the 5.5 GHz all

06:41

core you notice we have 5.6 selected and

06:43

we're not getting 56 we're actually at

06:44

54 right now and that's because of the

06:47

fact that it probably upped our power

06:48

limit to that 330 Mark which means that

06:51

with our voltage being extremely high

06:53

right now at

06:54

1.33 we're not even getting the number

06:56

we put in we're still not even getting

06:58

sustained advertis

07:00

numbers and we've added clock speed and

07:02

we've added voltage so the power and

07:04

current limits optimized gave us a limit

07:06

of 330 which is what I thought just

07:07

based on what I saw right there 425 amps

07:10

and then know so now we can actually

07:12

adjust this sort of stuff but I'm going

07:13

to go 5 six I'm going try 57 allore at

07:17

stock voltages let the 330 be the thing

07:19

I'm not going to update the voltage yeah

07:22

so you're immediately down to 5.5 GHz

07:24

we're at

07:25

323 Watts 91c now this is this is where

07:29

Asic quality really starts to play a

07:31

role where if we have a really good CPU

07:34

that will allow us to undervolt and

07:35

overclock then we'll get really good

07:37

performance here and I think 330 watt is

07:39

a safe limit to have because of the fact

07:42

that we know the 360 cooler can handle

07:43

that anything more than that would

07:45

require some exotic cooling probably

07:46

something chilled or or Beyond room temp

07:49

there's a

07:51

38835 but this is still underperforming

07:53

so much versus what I would expect I've

07:55

gotten for or 13900 K to be nearly

07:57

40,000 and above 40,000 this so far

08:00

would start to be a lot of tuning and a

08:01

lot of work for 300 MHz now what's more

08:06

important than quote unquote

08:07

overclocking these days is just getting

08:09

our advertised speeds for sustained

08:13

periods of time so here's what we're

08:14

going to do again we're going to drop

08:16

this back down to

08:17

5.5 we're going to leave the efficiency

08:19

core at uh 43 which is

08:24

stock and what I'm going to do is I'm

08:26

going to I want to leave the enhanced

08:28

limits cuz we know we need more power

08:30

limit to get it done but I'm going to

08:32

start playing with a offset here I'm

08:33

going to go minus 50

08:35

molts and let's see if this will allow

08:39

us to get all I'm trying to do now screw

08:42

overclocking I'm just trying to get that

08:43

allore number to stay all the time now

08:45

the thing is while gaming and stuff

08:46

right now with a lesser load it would

08:48

probably stay at 5'5 just fine but

08:50

overclocks are not considered stable

08:53

unless they can handle extreme workloads

08:55

like this without crashing like there's

08:56

game stable there's like General usage

08:59

stable and then there's like stress test

09:01

table and stress test table is the only

09:03

one that we really truly care about okay

09:05

there's 55 all

09:07

core 84c still at

09:11

55 84 83 so that looks like we have a

09:14

pretty good comparison there where

09:16

temperature is not going to cause us to

09:19

drop 55 the entire

09:22

time there's a 38329 so you see all I

09:26

did was I didn't overclock anything I

09:28

just dropped how much voltage it needed

09:29

um yeah we're only pulling 288 Watts

09:31

right now which is nice at 5.5 GHz but

09:34

as you can see the stock speeds couldn't

09:36

sustain that but the stock 253 watt

09:38

because the up two and the 253 watt

09:41

limit were never going to allow full

09:43

load to sustain those types of clocks

09:46

but I do want to see now if we can do a

09:47

56 allcore overclock at a minus 50 now

09:51

we're overclocking technically because

09:52

we are above the 5.5 recommended not

09:55

recommended but stated Max up two speeds

09:59

we stay at 56 the whole time there's a

10:01

38729 so not a huge gain but voltage and

10:04

frequency are linked so as frequency

10:06

goes up voltage goes up with it so now

10:09

I'm going to try minus

10:10

60 so now we drop to 307

10:13

309 or 89c

10:16

so this is also a spike right this is

10:18

the max temp so that means it hit 91 for

10:20

a second we're at 8889 now so we drop 3

10:24

c 2 c 3 C but there also will become a

10:27

point where you'll see the clocks the

10:29

stain but if you drop the voltage too

10:31

far you'll notice the score drops even

10:34

though the frequency stays the same and

10:35

the reason for that is because of the

10:37

lower uh available wattage to it and

10:39

that wattage um voltage linear frequency

10:43

scale you might there might be uh

10:46

frequency changes happening too quickly

10:47

to actually see in the software but the

10:50

frequency might be doing quick micro

10:52

adjustments that's enough to actually

10:54

affect the score so once you start to

10:55

see the score go down if you can if

10:57

you're like I can keep undervolting this

10:59

is is great you might notice performance

11:00

going down with it and stability is

11:02

still being there I'm going to drop down

11:04

to minus 80 and see if we can sustain

11:05

that if so then I might push the

11:07

efficiency cores up to 46 now we're

11:09

technically in overclocking territory oh

11:11

see we actually drop score right there

11:12

is a 39634 so I'm going to run this

11:14

again just to see if we continue like we

11:16

lost 200 points by dropping our voltage

11:19

I want to make sure not we're not

11:20

getting like micro throttling with the

11:23

frequency here that could have just been

11:25

a weird back-to-back run on that one

11:28

yeah we lost more points

11:30

39577 so I'm going to go- 75 and see if

11:34

that 5 molts helps you'd be surprised

11:35

what 5 molts can actually do it's a

11:38

39779 okay so let's try 46 eor oh

11:43

there's a hard system

11:45

lock so this video right now was not

11:47

about showing

11:49

you how to overclock it is showing you

11:53

how much work is actually kind of

11:54

involved to get a very mediocre

11:58

overclock overclocking The Way We Know

12:01

It And used to know it is very very

12:05

different than 10 years ago my best

12:08

overclocking CPU I ever owned was a

12:11

e6300 core2 Duo 1.86 GHz processor that

12:16

I ran at

12:17

3.34 GHz for its entire life almost

12:22

double the rated

12:24

speed it was two cores and no

12:26

hyperthreading that actually was

12:28

hyperthreading I don't remember I cannot

12:29

remember if it was hyperthreaded or not

12:31

but all I know is the frequency it ran

12:32

at was insane I ran that CPU for years

12:36

and then gave it to my brother-in-law

12:39

where he ran it until he killed the

12:40

motherboard completely unrelated to the

12:42

CPU that CPU never complained about

12:46

temperatures or frequency that was some

12:48

one of the most underrated CPUs ever but

12:51

back in the day you know we would be

12:52

able to push our our frequ we would see

12:54

CPU frequencies pushed 1,000 MHz above

12:57

its posted speeds but because the

12:59

hardware is being pushed to its limits

13:00

now because of the CPU race that took

13:02

place ever since ryzen came out with AMD

13:05

giving actual danger to Intel's market

13:07

share when it comes to desktop Computing

13:09

we saw this Race For Speed for clock

13:12

speed so essentially the manufacturers

13:16

like Intel and AMD have found ways to

13:20

push their CPUs to the Limit as close to

13:22

the Limit as they possibly can out of

13:24

the box I those updates underway push

13:26

the limits as far as they can out of the

13:28

box leaving us very little Headroom to

13:30

be able to actually kind of overclock

13:32

now gpus let's talk about gpus for a

13:34

second here I don't even really need to

13:35

demonstrate this one every single GPU

13:38

you plop on your computer on your

13:40

motherboard and fire up like MSI

13:42

afterburner and monitor your speeds

13:44

every single one of them will go beyond

13:46

where they're advertised they will Auto

13:48

overclock and that's by Design because

13:50

it's called GPU boost for NVIDIA um AMD

13:54

has other uh like Auto overclocks and

13:56

rage mode and stuff like that which are

13:58

not quite as a aggressive cuz AMD is

14:00

still kind of figuring out the the the

14:02

Silicon limits and stuff when it comes

14:04

to their gpus so they don't actually

14:05

allow you to push them too too far

14:07

there's a lot of modding required to

14:08

really push an AMD GPU but Nvidia on the

14:11

other hand when it comes to GPU boost

14:13

we're in GPU boost 3 plus territory now

14:16

where back in the day it used to push

14:18

the frequency if there was available

14:20

temperature Headroom then they GP boost

14:23

would allow it to push the frequency

14:24

with temperature Headroom and power

14:26

limit Headroom where it could go beyond

14:28

specified power limits see back in the

14:30

earlier days of GPU boost uh 1.0 you

14:33

could actually modify the voltage slider

14:35

you could actually move the voltage

14:37

slider and have it affect actual voltage

14:39

to the GPU giving you proper like real

14:42

overclock overclockability when it comes

14:44

to the end user once GPU Boost 2.0

14:47

allowed for power limit adjustment the

14:50

control of the voltage stopped being

14:53

accessible to the end user where all you

14:54

could do is control the voltage slider

14:56

what I mean by that is like I referenced

14:58

with the c you have there's a frequency

15:00

and a voltage uh correlation like