Insane Whistleblower Drama...

oompaville
24 Mar 202425:22

Summary

TLDRThe transcript discusses the recent controversies surrounding Boeing, highlighting multiple investigations including those by the National Transportation Safety Board, FAA, and the US Justice Department. It delves into the company's cost-saving measures following the COVID-19 pandemic, the retirement of the iconic 747, and the issues with the Boeing 737 Max series, including the Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashes. The narrative also touches on the historical evolution of aviation, from the Wright Brothers' first flight to the supersonic Concorde, and the current challenges faced by Boeing, including the Alaska Airlines flight 1282 incident where a cabin door failed mid-flight. The script raises concerns about systemic negligence, potential safety oversights, and the impact on consumer confidence in Boeing's aircraft.

Takeaways

  • 🚨 Boeing is currently facing multiple investigations, including one from the National Transportation Safety Board and a criminal probe by the US Justice Department.
  • 💰 The company is trying to save costs after a significant bailout during the COVID-19 pandemic, which included the retirement of the iconic 747 aircraft.
  • ✈️ The Boeing 737 Max series has been involved in several critical incidents, including the Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashes, which were linked to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS).
  • 🛫 The MCAS system was designed to prevent the plane's nose from getting too high, but malfunctions led to fatal crashes due to nose dive scenarios.
  • 💡 Boeing has been criticized for not adequately informing pilots about the MCAS system and for potentially downplaying its significance during the certification process.
  • 🚫 A recent incident involving an Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 Max 9, where a door blew off mid-flight, has raised further concerns about Boeing's manufacturing and safety standards.
  • 🛬 The Concorde, a supersonic jet that could fly from New York to London in 3.5 hours, was retired due to a combination of factors including sonic booms, a fatal crash, environmental concerns, and high operating costs.
  • 📉 Despite ongoing issues and controversies, Boeing continues to report revenue growth, though it also reports losses, raising questions about its financial health and business practices.
  • 🔍 Whistleblowers and undercover investigations have revealed systemic issues within Boeing, including rushed manufacturing processes, poor quality control, and a lack of oversight.
  • 🤝 Employee confidence in the safety of Boeing's aircraft is low, with many stating they would not fly on the planes they helped produce.

Q & A

  • What recent issues has Boeing faced according to the script?

    -Boeing has faced multiple investigations by the National Transportation Safety Board, FAA safety audits, and a reopening of a criminal probe by the US Justice Department. There have been incidents involving the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, including crashes and a midair emergency, as well as issues with other models like a door breaking off a 737 MAX 9.

  • What is the MCAS system and how did it contribute to Boeing 737 MAX crashes?

    -The Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) was designed for unusual maneuver situations to prevent the nose from getting too high by moving the stabilizer on the back of the plane. It malfunctioned due to receiving faulty data from a single angle of attack sensor, causing two 737 MAX 8 planes to crash by pushing the nose down improperly.

  • Why did Boeing not inform 737 MAX pilots about the MCAS system?

    -Boeing's CEO attempted to explain the omission by suggesting overconfidence in the system and a minimization of its significance during the certification process for the 737 MAX, which contributed to a lack of proper training and awareness among pilots about how to handle the MCAS system.

  • What was the significance of the Concorde aircraft mentioned in the script?

    -The Concorde was highlighted as a notable example of aviation innovation, being a supersonic passenger aircraft that could fly from New York to London in about 3.5 hours. Its retirement is used to illustrate how aviation technology has faced setbacks and challenges, including environmental concerns and high costs.

  • What systemic issues at Boeing are suggested by the script?

    -The script suggests systemic negligence at Boeing, including downplaying the significance of new systems like MCAS, improper training for pilots, quality control issues, and a culture that may prioritize cost-cutting over safety. This is supported by examples of faulty parts, manufacturing shortcuts, and whistleblowers raising alarms about safety standards.

  • How did Boeing respond to the crashes of the 737 MAX 8 aircraft?

    -Initially, Boeing expressed sympathies but also implied pilot error by stating other pilots had managed to handle similar issues. After the second crash, their response was brief, focusing on technical assistance for the investigation. This approach has been criticized as missing the mark and failing to take adequate responsibility.

  • What impact have Boeing's issues had on its reputation and consumer confidence?

    -Boeing's reputation has significantly soured due to the highlighted issues, leading to a loss of consumer confidence. This is illustrated by the script through examples of safety concerns, crashes, and systemic problems within the company, painting a picture of Boeing moving away from its former status as a trusted name in aviation.

  • What was the outcome of the Alaska Airlines flight mentioned in the script?

    -The Alaska Airlines flight, a Boeing 737 MAX 9, experienced a door breaking off after takeoff due to an improperly installed door plug, leading to minor injuries but no fatalities. This incident added to the growing concerns about Boeing's aircraft safety and quality control.

  • Why was the Concorde retired, according to the script?

    -The Concorde was retired due to a combination of factors, including noise pollution from its supersonic booms, environmental concerns about its impact on the ozone layer, high operational costs, and a decrease in demand following a fatal crash in 2000. This retirement reflects broader challenges in advancing commercial supersonic travel.

  • What are the implications of Boeing's alleged cost-cutting measures as discussed in the script?

    -The script implies that Boeing's cost-cutting measures have led to compromised safety standards, quality issues, and a lack of proper pilot training and system knowledge. This is portrayed as a factor contributing to the various incidents and accidents involving Boeing aircraft, raising serious concerns about the aviation industry's priorities.

Outlines

00:00

🛫 Boeing's Challenges and Aviation Safety Concerns

This paragraph discusses the recent investigations into Boeing, including those by the FAA and the US Justice Department, in light of safety concerns. It highlights the company's cost-cutting measures following the COVID-19 pandemic and the retirement of the iconic Boeing 747. The focus is on the Boeing 737 MAX 9 and its safety issues, including a midair emergency that forced an Alaska Airlines flight to land shortly after takeoff. The paragraph also contrasts aviation safety with the risks of driving and provides a brief history of aviation, from the Wright Brothers' first flight to the development of early aircraft.

05:03

🚀 The Rise and Fall of Supersonic Travel and the Concorde

This paragraph delves into the history of supersonic travel, particularly the Concorde, which was a joint venture between two European countries to develop a plane that could transport passengers at incredible speeds. It discusses the Concorde's impact on travel, its eventual retirement, and the reasons behind it, including sonic booms, a fatal crash in 2000, environmental concerns, and high costs. The paragraph also contrasts the Concorde's luxury and efficiency with the modern-day flying experience, noting the loss of amenities such as smoking on planes and full-course meals.

10:04

💥 Boeing 737 MAX Incidents and the MCAS System

The focus of this paragraph is on the Boeing 737 MAX crashes, specifically the Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, both of which involved the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS). It explores the system's role in the crashes, the lack of pilot training on the MCAS, and the potential consequences of a single faulty sensor. The paragraph also addresses Boeing's response to the crashes, the company's initial denial of responsibility, and the eventual acknowledgment of systemic issues within Boeing.

15:05

🛠️ Quality Control Issues and Public Trust in Boeing

This paragraph examines the quality control issues at Boeing, including incidents such as a door blowing off mid-flight and an engine fire on a Boeing 747 cargo plane. It discusses the company's internal inspections, whistleblower accounts of poor practices, and the impact of these issues on public trust in Boeing. The paragraph also touches on the company's financial struggles and the potential link between cost-cutting measures and safety compromises.

20:07

💔 Decline in Consumer Confidence and the Future of Boeing

The final paragraph reflects on the declining reputation of Boeing and the loss of consumer confidence due to the company's recent history of safety issues and quality control problems. It emphasizes that Boeing was once a trusted name in aviation manufacturing, but these incidents have tarnished that image. The paragraph suggests that the company's problems are not limited to the 737 MAX but are indicative of broader systemic issues within Boeing.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Boeing

Boeing is a multinational corporation known for its aerospace products, primarily commercial airplanes. In the context of the video, it is portrayed as a company facing numerous safety issues, investigations, and controversies related to its aircraft models, particularly the 737 Max series.

💡737 Max

The Boeing 737 Max is a family of narrow-body aircraft produced by Boeing. The 737 Max has been involved in several high-profile crashes and incidents, leading to global groundings and investigations. The video highlights the MCAS system, which played a role in the Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 disasters.

💡MCAS (Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System)

MCAS is a software system developed by Boeing for the 737 Max series to enhance the plane's flight characteristics. It is designed to prevent the aircraft's nose from pitching up excessively during flight. The video explains that the system's malfunction and the pilots' lack of training on it contributed to two fatal crashes.

💡Supersonic Travel

Supersonic travel refers to the ability of an aircraft to fly faster than the speed of sound. The video discusses the Concorde, a supersonic aircraft that could travel from New York to London in record time but was retired due to various issues including the sonic boom, environmental concerns, and high operating costs.

💡Safety Concerns

Safety concerns in the context of the video refer to the various issues and accidents associated with Boeing aircraft, particularly the 737 Max series. These concerns include design flaws, software malfunctions, and inadequate pilot training, which have led to crashes and loss of life.

💡Investigations

Investigations in this context refer to the formal inquiries conducted by various authorities into the safety and operational issues of Boeing aircraft. These investigations aim to uncover the causes of accidents and recommend measures to prevent future incidents.

💡Whistleblowers

Whistleblowers are individuals who expose wrongdoing, often within an organization. In the video, a former Boeing employee, John Barnett, is mentioned as a whistleblower who raised concerns about safety and manufacturing practices at Boeing before his death.

💡Consumer Confidence

Consumer confidence refers to the level of trust and assurance that consumers have in a product or service. In the context of the video, it relates to the public's trust in Boeing's ability to produce safe and reliable aircraft, which has been shaken by numerous incidents and controversies.

💡Cost-cutting

Cost-cutting refers to the practice of reducing expenses to increase profits. In the video, it is suggested that Boeing's cost-cutting measures may have compromised the safety and quality of their aircraft, leading to a series of high-profile accidents and incidents.

💡Aviation Safety

Aviation safety encompasses the measures and protocols designed to prevent accidents and ensure the well-being of passengers and crew in air travel. The video discusses the importance of aviation safety and how it has been compromised in recent incidents involving Boeing aircraft.

💡Regulatory Bodies

Regulatory bodies are organizations that establish and enforce rules and standards in a particular sector. In the context of aviation, these bodies ensure that aircraft manufacturers like Boeing adhere to safety and performance standards. The video mentions the FAA as a regulatory body that has been involved in investigating Boeing.

Highlights

Boeing is currently under multiple investigations, including one from the National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA, as well as a criminal probe by the US Justice Department.

The company is trying to save costs after their big bailout during COVID-19, which led to the retirement of the legendary 747 airplane.

Despite the 747's legacy, few people feel safe flying it in this day and age due to numerous problems.

The Boeing 737 Max 9 aircraft has been impacted by significant developments, including a midair emergency that forced an Alaska Airlines flight to land just minutes after takeoff.

Aviation is relatively safe compared to other modes of transportation, such as driving.

The Wright Brothers are credited with inventing the first engine-powered airplane, marking the beginning of aviation history.

The Concorde, a supersonic jet that could fly from New York to London in 3.5 hours, was retired in 2003 due to various reasons including cost, environmental impact, and safety concerns.

Boeing has faced controversies due to crashes involving their Boeing 737 Max 8, with the Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 resulting in a total of 346 fatalities.

The Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) on the 737 Max has been implicated in the crashes due to a faulty angle of attack sensor and lack of proper pilot training.

Boeing's response to the crashes has been criticized, with the company initially downplaying the significance of the MCAS system and blaming pilot error.

A recent incident involving a Boeing 737 Max 9 from Alaska Airlines, where a door blew off mid-flight, has further shaken consumer confidence in the company's aircraft.

Whistleblower accounts and undercover investigations have revealed systemic negligence and quality control issues within Boeing's manufacturing processes.

Boeing employees themselves have expressed concerns about the safety of the planes they produce, with many stating they would not fly on them.

Boeing's CEO has made controversial statements in response to the incidents, including a poorly received comment about a 'quality escape' during a CNBC interview.

The company has faced financial challenges, reporting losses despite increasing revenue, which has led to concerns about cost-cutting measures affecting aircraft quality and safety.

Boeing's reputation in the aviation industry has been significantly damaged due to these ongoing issues and lack of trust from consumers and pilots.

The FAA has deemed the 737 Max safe to fly after inspections and changes, but concerns remain about the overall safety and integrity of Boeing's aircraft.

A former Boeing employee, John Barnett, claimed that the issues with the 737 Max are indicative of broader problems within the company, beyond just one model.

The aviation industry is a serious business with high stakes, and the safety of aircraft should not be compromised for the sake of profit.

Consumer confidence in Boeing is waning, and the company's once-stellar reputation is souring due to the numerous safety concerns and incidents.

Transcripts

00:00

if you don't live under a rock and you

00:01

can afford plan tickets you may have

00:02

noticed something in the news in regard

00:04

to boing specifically lately there are

00:06

multiple investigations going on one

00:08

from the national Transportation safety

00:10

board FAA safety Audits and then of

00:13

course the reopening of a criminal probe

00:15

by the US justice department Boeing the

00:17

company that manufactures a lot of the

00:19

planes that people fly on currently at

00:21

commercial airports in and out you know

00:23

to and fro whatever you may have it this

00:25

massive company is trying to save costs

00:27

after their big bailout during covid-19

00:29

back in 2020 they retired the massive

00:31

747 truly a sexual big chungus in the

00:34

airline world there's nothing as

00:37

beautiful as

00:39

747 and in spite of the 747 being a

00:42

pretty legendary airplane there are so

00:44

many problems now that very few people

00:47

feel safe flying in this day and age big

00:50

developments impacting the Boeing 737

00:52

max9 Airy aircraft this after a midair

00:56

emergency forced an Alaska Airlines

00:58

flight to land just minutes after taking

01:01

off in spite of my irrational fears and

01:03

the irrational fears of many people

01:04

Aviation is relatively safe okay

01:06

especially when you compare it with

01:07

driving on the road there bunch of

01:09

people die every single year from

01:10

driving in cars and crashes and tires

01:12

falling off the first dumbass looking

01:14

plane made from [ __ ] Balsa wooden

01:16

paper was made by these brothers called

01:18

the right Brothers out in North Carolina

01:21

and as every school child learns the

01:23

Dayton Ohio Duo became the first people

01:27

in history to successfully pilot an

01:30

engine powerered airplane and it's a

01:32

dude lying on his stomach flying through

01:36

the air that's some 1800s type [ __ ]

01:38

right there guys for sure early 1900s

01:40

whatever turn of the 20th after this

01:42

another iteration potentially even worse

01:44

than the first would have a man sitting

01:46

inches away from a spinning propeller

01:49

what was wrong with these

01:52

[Music]

01:57

people I guess it beats [ __ ] tuul

02:00

though and disent and all that a genuine

02:02

death trap that could barely maneuver

02:04

itself wow every time they went up in

02:08

this motor driven airplane they were

02:12

risking their lives this is something

02:14

cannot be overemphasized that's kind of

02:16

like the beginning okay and there have

02:18

been so many bad ideas in in the

02:20

aviation World from the very beginning

02:22

that they couldn't imagine what we're

02:24

working with now the Creations that

02:27

touch the sky that kiss God's God's

02:30

undercarriage especially when they were

02:32

inventing [ __ ] like this what is that

02:35

that's not going to work and in spite of

02:36

all this in spite of learning whatever

02:38

whatever we have these giant houses that

02:40

can fly through the sky now Evolution

02:42

always works in reverse and time is a

02:44

flat circle I think I don't know I've

02:46

been told that before cutting costs will

02:47

always be Victorious and we will always

02:49

return to bals of wood and paper you

02:51

younglings may not remember this but

02:53

there was a plane that could fly from

02:55

New York to London in 3 and 1 half hours

02:57

it completely dominated the skies it was

02:59

called the Concord it was a joint

03:01

venture between two European countries

03:04

to develop a plane unlike any other to

03:06

transport passengers at unbelievable

03:09

speeds and as a result bring the world

03:11

closer together it allowed our friends

03:13

from across the pond to visit America in

03:16

the same amount of time that it takes to

03:17

fly from dullas to DFW or to drive

03:20

basically a quarter of the way through

03:22

Texas now with our incredibly epic

03:24

modern technology it takes about 7 hours

03:26

to fly from New York to London once

03:29

again it's Evolution reverse in 1969

03:31

this insanely epic and very ugly

03:33

airplane made its first successful

03:35

flight flying at 1354 M an hour twice

03:38

the speed of sound I guess that's mock 2

03:41

I don't really know also the way that

03:42

this thing looks I said it was ugly it

03:44

looks like it came straight from a

03:45

sci-fi movie it it it seems like what

03:47

people think airplanes would look like

03:49

back in the Orval Redenbacher days since

03:52

Pilots couldn't see out of the plane

03:54

because of angled Landing Engineers put

03:56

together a solution the Concord featured

03:59

a droop snoo droop snoot no the snoot

04:02

would droop the snoot droop I'd rather

04:04

have that ugly [ __ ] [ __ ] with its

04:05

probiscus be flying around rather than

04:07

these ugly [ __ ] with their dumbass

04:10

thing at least their [ __ ] doors don't

04:11

fall off on the Concord but these things

04:13

are affordable and they're simple but

04:15

they're also pathetic also you guys may

04:17

be forgetting you used to be able to

04:18

smoke on airplanes which was completely

04:20

baller and very sick and we need to

04:22

bring that back soon as possible smoking

04:24

was chill they had chefs serving full

04:28

course meals it was amazing normally

04:30

people complain about how bad the

04:32

airline food is I I will attest in this

04:34

case that was not true this was one of

04:35

the best meals I ever had it worked

04:37

beautifully you know a normal French

04:39

meal takes 2 and 1 half 3 hours well by

04:42

the time dinner was over we were here

04:44

and now I've been told you get served a

04:46

cracker in a cup it was retired on the

04:48

24th of October 2003 and put into

04:51

history museums that ugly bastard was

04:53

never to be seen from again so why was

04:55

it

04:55

retired the reasons go on and on a

04:59

couple of reasons very valid one reason

05:02

it's supersonic so it makes a lot of

05:04

explosive booming sounds whenever it

05:06

goes anywhere I don't if you live near a

05:08

military base I live near a few military

05:10

bases and every now and then some some f

05:12

some some hot shots will fly over and it

05:14

sounds like a [ __ ] bomb going off and

05:15

it shakes [ __ ] knocks stuff off the

05:17

walls in the' 60s the Air Force ran a

05:19

test of Sonic booms over Oklahoma City

05:22

and residents reported hundreds of

05:24

damaged windows and noise disturbances

05:26

all that meant limiting supersonic

05:28

flight to a the ocean there would be no

05:31

New York to LA Concord that's part of

05:34

what quashed the American supersonic

05:36

experiment with Boeing on top of the

05:38

supersonic booms there was also a huge

05:40

fatality accident in the year of 2000 on

05:43

J July 25th a Concord was damaged while

05:46

taking off and it resulted in 113

05:49

fatalities and then this a year

05:52

later and boom the aircraft Market kind

05:57

of probably maybe let's try a different

05:59

approach approach to the aircraft Market

06:00

people don't really want to fly on

06:03

extremely fast supersonic planes that

06:05

crash and blow up and then also you've

06:09

got but while both tragedies did affect

06:12

Concord there're only a couple of pieces

06:14

of the fundamental challenges for the

06:16

plane more reasons would be damage to

06:18

the ozone layer apparently supersonic

06:20

Jets if there was hundreds of thousands

06:22

of them flying around it would burn up

06:24

the ozone 10 times quicker I'm not even

06:26

sure if that's true that's just what

06:27

people said noise concerns were paired

06:29

with with environmental concerns uh

06:32

there will be severe environmental

06:34

damage to the ozone layer the plane's

06:35

High flight pattern made scientists

06:37

think its exhaust gas could be more

06:40

threatening to the ozone than normal

06:42

Jets I don't know anything about the

06:43

ozone layer I know there's a hole in it

06:45

or at least there was or something

06:46

people don't talk about the ozone Lair

06:48

anymore I'm not sure the science but on

06:49

top of that too the cost it it was

06:52

pretty pretty expensive to make these

06:54

bad boys all the managerial directoral

06:57

executive aspects of businesses are

06:58

always controlled by these Geniuses who

07:01

all have the exact same idea which is to

07:03

make as much money as possible all the

07:05

time no matter what and boom Concord

07:08

doesn't exist anymore on top of that the

07:10

air buses could travel much further you

07:12

know they just it was more efficient

07:13

overall to uh rely on on them fellas and

07:16

the highest price seats for the Concord

07:18

cost around $12,000 there wasn't a lot

07:20

of availability there now back to Boeing

07:22

Boeing has also had some crashes it

07:25

doesn't just specifically begin and end

07:27

at Concord Boeing has had quite a few

07:29

planes go down the largest controversies

07:32

regarding Boeing crashes are the October

07:34

9th 2018 lion airflight 610 which was a

07:38

Boeing 737 Max 8 189 people were killed

07:41

in the crash of Lion Air Flight 610 the

07:44

March 10th 2019 crash of Ethiopian

07:47

Airline flight 302 which was once again

07:50

a Boeing 737 Max 8 new 737 Max 8

07:54

jetliner crashed today and in the very

07:57

recent January 5th 202 for Alaskan

08:00

Airlines flight 1282 Boeing 737 Max 99

08:04

Alaska Airlines is now grounding its

08:06

entire fleet of Boeing 737 n Max planes

08:10

after a terrifying trip on Friday Alaska

08:12

Airlines flight 1282 had just taken off

08:16

from Portland Oregon when a section of

08:18

its cabin ripped off leaving a gaping

08:20

hole as you see right there in the jet

08:22

with more than 170 passengers on board

08:25

the first flight we mentioned the 737

08:27

Max 8 lion airf flight 610 crashed after

08:31

taking off from an airport in Indonesia

08:34

after 15 minutes in Flight tragically

08:36

killing all 189 people aboard not long

08:38

after the second flight Ethiopian flight

08:41

302 another Boeing 737 Max 8 traveling

08:44

from Ethiopia to Kenya would crash in

08:46

even less time than the lion airflight

08:49

610 so what caused these crashes these

08:51

incredibly Unfortunate Events not user

08:53

air not a a typical system malfunction

08:55

these planes crash in a NOS down dive

08:58

into the [ __ ] ground quite literally

09:00

they just

09:01

went it's terrible the 737 Maxes were a

09:04

bit different from their predecessors

09:06

the 737 in one way in particular that

09:08

they had an mcast system the maneuvering

09:10

characteristics augmentation system

09:14

mcast it was designed for these

09:16

extremely unusual Maneuvers situations

09:20

that hopefully the plane would never get

09:22

in and to prevent the nose from getting

09:26

too high the system would move the

09:28

stabilizer on the back of the plane to

09:31

push the nose back down the MC would

09:34

take readings from the single angle of

09:36

attack sensor on the aircraft and then

09:38

make Corrections that are determined to

09:40

be needed and then it would make those

09:41

Corrections and that malfunctioned and

09:43

as a consequence of this angle of attack

09:46

data error the mcast activated when it

09:50

really shouldn't have we'll ask a

09:52

hypothetical question first so you can

09:54

understand this what if a pilot that was

09:56

used to Flying a 737 sat in the 737 Max

10:00

and wasn't used to this feature what

10:02

would they do what would happen well the

10:04

plane would nose dive and crash just

10:06

like what happened in those two planes

10:08

and Boeing's CEO tried his best to

10:10

explain why the company didn't tell 737

10:13

Max Pilots about the software system

10:15

that contributed to those two fatal

10:17

crashes another hypothetical question

10:19

what if there wasn't proper training on

10:21

this new system that is meant to augment

10:24

the plane's angle of attack what if

10:27

there wasn't training uh that existed in

10:30

any way for anyone to access especially

10:32

Pilots of those airplanes and now

10:34

Boeing's focusing on pilot training

10:36

luckily because Boeing omitted safety

10:38

system details and minimized training

10:41

for the 737 Max Pilots that were used to

10:44

737 planes and the worst addition to the

10:47

hypothetical that is no longer a

10:48

hypothetical is that the Lion Air Pilots

10:50

were looking at their handbook when the

10:53

plane crashed now I'll ask another

10:55

hypothetical question what if the single

10:57

sensor the angle attack sensor was

11:00

faulty or had a false reading what would

11:03

happened then 2 minutes into the flight

11:05

based on faulty data from the AOA sensor

11:08

mcast kicked in and began pushing the

11:10

nose down if this system can control the

11:13

entire plane and the pilots don't know

11:15

how to use this system because they're

11:17

not taught how to use it and the sensor

11:18

has been flagged 216 times to the FAA

11:21

for being faulty what would happen then

11:24

nothing good here's another hypothetical

11:26

what if Pilots couldn't actually

11:28

override the system that determined a

11:30

NOS down dive was the best course of

11:32

action for the mcast system

11:35

uh it probably crash and that my friends

11:38

is exactly what happened how about one

11:39

more hypothetical what if Boeing

11:41

downplayed the significance of the mcast

11:44

system during the process of certifying

11:46

the 737 Max for use in commercial

11:49

airlines what if that happened guys

11:51

that'd be terrible if that happened oh

11:54

wait that did happen so we threw some

11:58

hypothetical spetti at the wall and

12:00

hypothetically every single [ __ ]

12:02

noodle stuck bro it's a full-on

12:05

conspiracy theory wet dream it's real

12:08

though it's not a dream it's actually

12:10

the reality so at best this all points

12:12

to Boeing being very overconfident in

12:15

their new system and criminally

12:17

negligent at worst or maybe a

12:19

combination of both equally so at least

12:21

after these two horrible disasters there

12:23

weren't any more issues with Boeing 737

12:26

Max planes were there well no guys in

12:28

January of 20 24 a Boeing 737 Max 9

12:32

going from Oregon to California had a

12:34

door break off completely after takeoff

12:37

because the door plug was improperly

12:39

installed the national Transportation

12:41

safety board says right after the plane

12:42

took off the door plug depressurized

12:45

they're analyzing the plug saying they

12:47

believe it holds Clues to what could

12:49

have caused the accident B was a bit

12:51

more recent not as bad as the mcast but

12:53

still a you know Borderline Disaster

12:56

especially for bone in this incident

12:57

injuries were minor and there were no

12:59

deaths considering it was so soon after

13:01

takeoff but still the plane did

13:04

experience explosive decompression the

13:06

boy shirt was sucked off him went out of

13:08

the plane and his mother was holding on

13:10

to him I saw half of his body was

13:12

getting stck out and then I was like oh

13:15

my God and I look over and there's a

13:18

hole on the side of the plane and had

13:20

the plane been further along into the

13:21

flight it would have been absolutely

13:23

catastrophic I would love to see what

13:25

percentage of people on this flight will

13:28

ever fly ever again probably a lot of

13:30

them probably a surprising amount I know

13:32

I wouldn't I just wouldn't in general

13:34

maybe this one was just old no it was

13:35

fresh off the line brand new but it was

13:37

made of [ __ ] Legos or at least the

13:39

door was it seemed like people on

13:41

Twitter are making fun of Boeing in this

13:43

plane specifically so it's a it's a you

13:45

know pretty scary being on a plane

13:47

that's quite literally falling apart now

13:49

how would Boeing respond to these

13:52

incidents guys how would beinging

13:54

respond just how you'd think after the

13:55

crash and loss of everyone aboard the

13:58

lion airflight 6 10 Boeing put out a

14:00

statement they expressed their deepest

14:02

and most heartfelt sympathies to the

14:04

families of those aboard at the start

14:06

and then they said that safety is a core

14:07

value at Boe clearly later they

14:10

indicated that this crash was a result

14:12

of pilot error stating that the day

14:14

before Pilots were able to disable the

14:16

nose down trim they basically saying oh

14:19

man it's a bummer this happened to you

14:21

guys I'm really sorry about that we love

14:23

safety and also the other Pilots that

14:25

fly these airplanes were able to deal

14:27

with our faulty sensors I guess these

14:29

guys flying that plane just weren't as

14:30

good as them so you know not our fault

14:33

though it would be like if Tesla's

14:34

autopilot just caused cars to drive full

14:37

speed into brick walls exclusively and

14:39

then Elon Musk went on Twitter to say

14:41

well it didn't do that yesterday even

14:43

though it kept trying to so it's like

14:45

guess the driver just didn't know how to

14:46

deal with that after this it seems like

14:48

Boeing realized that this statement sort

14:50

of missed the mark So when the second

14:52

airplane crashed in the exact same way

14:54

they kept their updated statement very

14:56

very very brief in fact beyond the

14:58

similar initial statement expressing

15:01

their sympathies the only sentence that

15:03

they write is basically them saying that

15:05

one of their technical teams is going to

15:06

the crash site to assist in an

15:08

investigation and probably be really sad

15:10

just seeing what they're responsible for

15:12
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