Experts discuss Baltimore bridge collapse investigation, early findings

CBS News
26 Mar 202414:48

Summary

TLDRThe transcript discusses a maritime incident where a ship lost propulsion before colliding with a bridge. James Meran, the president of the New York Board of Pilot Commissioners, explains the potential scenarios and emergency measures like dropping anchor. The conversation highlights the complexity of the situation, the training of pilots, and the challenges faced during emergencies. The interview also touches on the liability and legal implications of the accident, emphasizing the need for a thorough investigation by the NTSB and Coast Guard. The discussion includes the bridge's structural integrity and the ongoing rescue efforts, with the priority on search and rescue operations.

Takeaways

  • 🚒 The ship lost propulsion and steering before the collision with the bridge, rendering it uncontrollable.
  • 🌫️ A large puff of black smoke was observed just before the impact, possibly indicating a last-minute attempt to regain power or control.
  • πŸ›³οΈ Pilots and captains are trained to drop anchor in such situations, but it may not always be effective to stop the ship quickly.
  • πŸ“ The ship's size, over 900 feet long, makes stopping it a significant challenge even with emergency measures.
  • 🚨 The Mayday call indicates a significant mechanical failure on the ship, which would be thoroughly investigated.
  • πŸ“ Modern ships have Voyage Data Recorders (VDRs) that provide detailed information about the events leading to an incident.
  • πŸ‘¨β€βš–οΈ James Maran, a maritime attorney, suggests that the liability case will be complex and take years to resolve, involving multiple parties and claims.
  • πŸŒ‰ The bridge's design and ability to withstand such an impact is questioned, considering the ship's massive size and force.
  • πŸ› οΈ The investigation into the cause of the accident will be led by the NTSB and the Coast Guard, with a focus on understanding the mechanical failure.
  • πŸ” The structural integrity of the bridge had been inspected, with concerns raised in a recent report, which will be a factor in the investigation.

Q & A

  • What does it mean when a ship loses propulsion before the bridge collapses?

    -When a ship loses propulsion before the bridge collapses, it implies that the ship has lost both steering and power. This situation renders the ship unable to navigate effectively and it becomes a 'dead ship' being carried by the current or its own momentum, significantly limiting the options available to the crew in maintaining steerage, especially in narrow channels like the one in New York Harbor.

  • How might a pilot be trained to react to a loss of propulsion?

    -Pilots are trained to handle such situations by fighting to restore power in the engine room, as without propulsion, maintaining steerage becomes extremely challenging. In some cases, they may also be trained to drop anchors, although this comes with the risk of running over their own anchors if the ship cannot go in reverse and has significant forward momentum.

  • What could the big puff of black smoke observed prior to the collision indicate?

    -The big puff of black smoke could suggest that power was restored at the last minute and the pilot was attempting an emergency maneuver, such as going full astern or making a hard left turn, to avoid the collision.

  • What is the role of a voyage data recorder (VDR) in such incidents?

    -A voyage data recorder (VDR) is the maritime equivalent of a black box in airplanes. It records various parameters of the ship, including rudder angle and propulsion, as well as audio from the bridge. This information is crucial in determining the sequence of events leading to the incident and identifying the cause of the malfunction.

  • What are the potential legal implications of the incident?

    -The legal implications are vast, involving damage to the bridge and the ship, casualty and injury claims, business interruption claims due to the halted commerce, and the need for a major salvage operation. The case could take years to resolve, involving numerous attorneys and significant insurance considerations.

  • How long would it take for a ship of this size to come to a complete stop after dropping anchors?

    -Given the ship's length of over 900 feet and a speed of about eight knots, it would likely take the length of five or six football fields to come to a complete stop, even after dropping the anchors, due to the ship's momentum and power.

  • What is the significance of the ship's lights flickering before the collision?

    -The flickering lights could indicate a momentary restoration of power, which might have been an attempt by the pilot to regain control and avoid the collision.

  • What is the role of the Coast Guard and NTSB in investigating such incidents?

    -The Coast Guard and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will conduct a thorough investigation into the incident. They will examine the ship, interview surviving crew members, and analyze the voyage data recorder to determine the cause of the mechanical failure that led to the loss of propulsion and steering.

  • How does the infrastructure, such as the bridge, factor into the investigation?

    -The investigation will also consider the bridge's design and ability to withstand such an impact. Federal inspection reports and the bridge's overall condition will be reviewed to understand if there were any pre-existing concerns that may have contributed to the rapid collapse of the bridge.

  • What are the search and rescue efforts like in the aftermath of the incident?

    -Search and rescue efforts involve dive and rescue teams, sonar and infrared equipment to locate victims in the water, and aerial searches. The efforts are focused on identifying and reaching victims as efficiently as possible, taking into account the challenges posed by tides and the need for cautious operation near the collapsed bridge structure.

  • What precautions are being taken by the rescue team considering the recent bridge collapse?

    -The rescue team is operating cautiously, maintaining a safe distance from the collapsed bridge structure to avoid any adverse conditions that may affect their operations and safety.

Outlines

00:00

🚒 Ship's Loss of Propulsion and Pilot's Response

The first paragraph discusses the situation where a ship lost propulsion before the bridge collapse. James Meran, the president of the New York Board of Pilot Commissioners, explains the implications of losing both steering and power, rendering the ship uncontrollable. He highlights the importance of the crew's efforts to restore power and the potential emergency maneuvers, such as dropping anchors, despite the challenges posed by the ship's size and momentum. The conversation also touches on the role of the voyage data recorder (VDR) in providing crucial information for the investigation.

05:00

🚨 Liability and Legal Implications

In the second paragraph, the discussion shifts towards the legal aspects of the incident. As a maritime attorney, James Meran elaborates on the complexity of the case, which involves damage to the bridge and ship, casualty and injury claims, business interruption, and cargo delays. He emphasizes the extensive litigation process and the need for thorough investigation to determine the cause of the accident. The conversation also notes the role of insurance in covering the significant costs associated with such incidents.

10:01

πŸ” Investigation and Infrastructure Concerns

The third paragraph focuses on the investigation into the cause of the ship's accident and the structural integrity of the bridge. Robert Sewalt, a former chair of the National Transportation Safety Board, explains the difficulty of designing a bridge to withstand the impact of a large ship. The conversation addresses the federal inspection of the Key Bridge, which had been rated fair. The priority of search and rescue efforts is also highlighted, along with the challenges posed by the tides and the need for cautious operations due to the recent bridge collapse.

Mindmap

Keywords

πŸ’‘propulsion

Propulsion refers to the ability of a vessel to move forward or backward through the application of thrust. In the context of the video, the loss of propulsion indicates that the ship lost its ability to steer and move, rendering it essentially a 'dead ship' at the mercy of currents and momentum. This is critical as it sets the stage for the subsequent events, including the collision with the bridge.

πŸ’‘pilot

A pilot in the maritime context is a professional who navigates vessels through waterways, ensuring safe passage. In the video, the pilot's training and reaction to the loss of propulsion are discussed, highlighting their crucial role in managing emergencies at sea. The pilot's actions and decisions in such situations can significantly impact the outcome of an event.

πŸ’‘anchor

An anchor is a device used to moor a vessel by securing it to the bed of the body of water in which it is located. In the video, the discussion about dropping the anchor highlights a potential emergency measure to stop a ship that has lost propulsion. However, the effectiveness of this action depends on various factors, including the ship's momentum and the presence of crew members to deploy the anchor.

πŸ’‘voyage data recorder (VDR)

A voyage data recorder (VDR) is an electronic system used aboard modern ships to record various parameters, similar to a black box in aviation. It provides critical data about the ship's operations, including verbal communications, which can be invaluable in investigations following maritime incidents. The VDR's data can help determine the sequence of events leading up to an accident, including mechanical failures and crew actions.

πŸ’‘bridge

In the context of the video, a bridge refers to the structure that was hit and collapsed. It is a critical piece of infrastructure that facilitates transportation and commerce. The collapse of the bridge has significant implications for safety, transportation, and the local economy. The bridge's design and ability to withstand impacts are also part of the discussion, as it is considered whether the infrastructure should have been capable of withstanding the strike from the ship.

πŸ’‘salvage operation

A salvage operation is the process of recovering and repairing a ship or its cargo after an accident or disaster. In the video, the salvage operation is mentioned in the context of the extensive work required to remove the remnants of the collapsed bridge and to deal with the wreck of the ship. This operation can take weeks and has significant implications for commerce and the local community.

πŸ’‘liability

Liability in this context refers to the legal responsibility for damages or injuries caused by an accident or incident. The video discusses the potential for significant liability in the case of the ship's collision with the bridge, including damage to the bridge and ship, casualties, injury claims, and business interruption claims. The complexity of this case is emphasized, as it involves multiple parties and requires extensive legal proceedings.

πŸ’‘NTSB

The NTSB, or National Transportation Safety Board, is a U.S. government agency that investigates transportation accidents and makes safety recommendations to prevent future occurrences. In the video, the NTSB is expected to lead or participate in the investigation into the cause of the ship's collision with the bridge, highlighting the importance of understanding the factors that led to this incident.

πŸ’‘rescue efforts

Rescue efforts refer to the organized actions taken to save people in distress or danger. In the video, the rescue efforts are described as extensive, involving dive and rescue teams, sonar equipment, and infrared technology. These efforts are crucial in the immediate aftermath of the incident to locate and assist those affected by the disaster.

πŸ’‘structural concerns

Structural concerns refer to potential issues with the integrity of buildings or infrastructure. In the video, these concerns are relevant to the bridge that collapsed and the potential risks to the rescue teams operating in the area. The safety of the rescue personnel and the stability of the surrounding structures are important considerations following such a significant event.

Highlights

James Meran, the president of the New York Board of Pilot Commissioners, provides insights on the ship's loss of propulsion and potential reactions of the pilot.

The ship lost both steering and power, rendering it a 'dead ship' just being carried by current or its own momentum.

A large puff of black smoke moments before the collision might suggest a last-minute attempt to regain power and maneuver.

Pilots and captains are trained to drop anchor in such situations, but the ship's momentum could cause it to run over its own anchor.

The ship's length and speed would require a significant distance to stop, even with anchors deployed.

The presence of a bow watch person and their readiness to deploy anchors in an emergency is crucial.

Modern ships are equipped with a Voyage Data Recorder (VDR), which records everything that happens on the bridge.

The investigation will involve examining the VDR to determine the exact sequence of events leading to the malfunction.

Robert Sewalt, a former chair of the National Transportation Safety Board, suggests the incident points to a mechanical error.

The steering system on the ship is hydraulically powered, and a loss of electrical power would result in a loss of steering.

The investigation into the cause of the incident will be led by the NTSB and the Coast Guard.

The bridge's design could not possibly withstand the impact of a ship with the mass of the one involved in the incident.

The latest federal inspection of the bridge scored it a six out of nine, indicating it was in fair condition.

Search and rescue efforts are the priority, utilizing sonar and infrared equipment to locate victims in the water.

Dive and rescue teams are deployed and will reassess their approach with the arrival of daylight.

The current in the water presents a challenge as it may have moved individuals away from the initial point of entry.

Structural concerns due to the bridge collapse require cautious operation by the rescue team.

Transcripts

00:01

for more on this story I want to bring

00:03

in James meran he is the president of

00:05

the New York Board of pilot

00:07

Commissioners this is a state agency

00:09

responsible for licensing and regulating

00:11

boat Pilots he's also a maritime

00:13

attorney thank you for being with us

00:15

James good morning Chanel nice to be

00:19

here so we can now report James the ship

00:21

lost propulsion before the bridge

00:23

collaps talk to us about what that

00:25

really means and how a pilot might be

00:28

trained to react to something like that

00:31

well what what's going to depend is if

00:33

when you say loss of propulsion whether

00:35

it lost steering and power if it lost

00:37

steering in power then basically it's a

00:39

dead ship uh just being carried by the

00:42

current or its own momentum uh I thought

00:45

it was very interesting that at the the

00:46

last second prior to the impact you did

00:49

see a big big puff of black real dark

00:52

black smoke which which which could

00:54

indicate Chanel that uh either power was

00:57

restored at the last minute and the

01:00

pilot was attempting to uh make an

01:03

emergency maneuver either by going full

01:06

a Stern or by making a hard hard left

01:09

turn uh you know and and so that that's

01:12

going to be very interesting to

01:13

determine whether or not uh they lost

01:16

power and steering uh or um and whether

01:20

or not it was restored because we see

01:23

that we see a lot of loss of propulsions

01:25

here in New York Harbor and the crew is

01:27

usually

01:28

fighting feverously uh in the engine

01:31

room to restore that power because

01:33

without that propulsion you're basically

01:36

uh uh you're just being trying to

01:38

maintain bare steerageway and in a

01:41

narrow you know Channel like this uh

01:43

where you could run a ground on one side

01:45

hit a bridge on the other side uh your

01:48

options are are very limited uh so uh

01:51

that's my observation of what I've seen

01:53

so far so James based on what we know

01:55

and just given the speed and the size of

01:58

this vessel was there any other way this

02:00

could have panned

02:03

out uh well one thing that the pilots

02:05

and the captains are trained to do in a

02:07

in a situation like this is is to drop

02:09

anchor uh the ship has two the two very

02:12

huge anchors uh the problem is that if

02:16

you have momentum going forward and you

02:18

can't go in reverse and you drop your

02:20

anchors you're can to end up running

02:22

over your own your own anchor now you

02:24

eventually may stop but you got to

02:26

remember this is a this ship is three

02:27

football fields long it's over 900 ft

02:30

long and someone reported it was going

02:32

about eight knots now eight knots is not

02:34

a big speed in in in an open area like

02:37

that but um uh it it it it would take

02:41

quite a while uh probably the length of

02:45

you know five six football fields to

02:48

bring that ship to a stop even after

02:50

dropping the anchors because of it's if

02:53

its power and momentum this is a

02:55

behemoth this is three football fields

02:57

long so but typically that's the only

02:59

recourse

03:00

that the pile to the captains have is to

03:02

drop their anchors and I imagine if they

03:04

didn't do that here we don't know we

03:06

haven't heard any reports on that

03:07

there'd be a good reason uh that they

03:10

fig figured that that that wouldn't

03:11

wouldn't have uh stopped the incident

03:13

from happening plus when you drop an

03:15

anchor usually the ship will start

03:17

swinging uh on its anchor and instead of

03:19

the bow hitting the bridge you could

03:21

have had the the stern of the ship

03:23

hitting the bridge so uh there was

03:25

really once they did a Mayday and

03:27

obviously the MayDay is a big big deal

03:30

because if the pilots radio to MayDay

03:32

then there was a big mechanical failure

03:34

either loss of propulsion steering or

03:37

both and James I don't know if we had

03:39

the answer to this question but I'll ask

03:41

it anyway just given where we saw the

03:44

ship had that moment where the lights

03:46

were flickering and then where we saw

03:48

that it actually hit the column and the

03:50

bridge came down in your assessment and

03:52

your in your experience would there have

03:54

been time to put that anchor

03:56

down you well it and that would depend

03:59

whether there was crew on the bow right

04:02

because the anchor is on the bow and

04:04

that and typically when ships get

04:06

underway like this from a port there's

04:08

there's there is a bow watch person and

04:10

and the NTSB the Coast Guard will be

04:12

looking at that was there someone on the

04:14

bow was there crew on Lookout and if

04:16

there is an emergency they should be

04:18

ready to deploy their anchors uh in in a

04:21

second's notice I mean the the the pilot

04:23

or the captain radios the bridge uh

04:25

excuse me radios the bow the crew member

04:27

on the bow has his radio they say drop

04:30

anchor and they would drop anchor so

04:32

that's going to be interesting to see if

04:34

that was looked at and it's also should

04:36

be noted that these ships have the the

04:39

functional equivalent of a black box and

04:41

I haven't heard anyone talk about that

04:43

yet but all these ships these modern-day

04:45

ships have what they call a vdr a voyage

04:48

data recorder so everything that went on

04:50

in that bridge it verbally is recorded

04:53

and that of course will be studied very

04:55

very carefully so they'll have to

04:57

determine well when when in the voyage

05:00

for example did the ship experience a a

05:03

malfunction whether it was power or or

05:05

steering and that'll be determined

05:07

because the voyage data recorder has a

05:09

has a a Time on it so it'll be it'll be

05:12

second by second by second so they'll

05:15

know exactly when the May Mayday was

05:17

radioed they'll know exactly when the

05:19

ship lost uh Power or propulsion by by

05:22

by what was going on in the bridge and

05:24

look these Pilots are very very

05:26

well-trained very skilled Pilots they've

05:28

probably done this Voyage thousands of

05:31

times it's not a challenging uh Voyage

05:34

so what makes it challenging is what

05:36

happened on the on the ship uh as far as

05:41

you know otherwise um maneuvering under

05:44

that bridge even at night is is is a is

05:47

a piece of cake for for these skilled

05:50

Maryland pilots and James we know that

05:52

you're also a maritime attorney so I do

05:54

want to ask you about what the liability

05:56

in this might look

05:58

like well well uh it it it's it's going

06:01

to be one heck of a case and it's going

06:04

to take a lot of attorneys for a lot of

06:06

years to sort through all all this with

06:08

the uh not only the damage to the bridge

06:11

the damage to the ship the the

06:13

casualties there'll be there'll be

06:15

fatality claims there'll be injury

06:16

claims there'll be you know business

06:18

Interruption claims for the the the

06:21

bridge collapsing the people that have

06:22

to get to and from work uh this the fact

06:25

that Commerce is stopping no ships are

06:28

going in no ships are going out there's

06:30

going to be a major Salvage operation

06:32

where they have to remove the the

06:35

remnants of the bridge there's going to

06:36

be a wreck removal a salvage and that's

06:39

going to take weeks and meanwhile you

06:40

have you may have a cruise ship in there

06:43

a cruise ship that was on their way in

06:45

and you know you're going to have so so

06:46

many Charter party disputes as to you

06:49

know that it could be perishable cargo

06:51

uh cargo delays so the the the the the

06:54

the litigation the maritime litigation

06:56

here is going to be a textbook like law

06:58

school type case

07:00

and there's going to be major

07:01

implications and obviously that's where

07:04

you know these big ships have major

07:05

Insurance behind them and uh hopefully

07:08

enough we'll see okay James Maran thank

07:11

you and for more on this developing

07:13

story we want to bring back in CBS News

07:15

Transportation safety analyst Robert

07:17

sewalt he is also the former chair of

07:20

the national Transportation safety board

07:22

Robert we're glad to have you back we

07:24

also have some new information we can

07:25

now confirm the shipped lost propulsion

07:28

before crashing into into the bridge

07:30

explain what that

07:32

means well that pretty much um uh says a

07:36

lot right there the uh we can see from

07:38

the video that the that the lights of

07:41

the ship blink out momentarily and then

07:43

come back on before it collided with the

07:46

with the pier or with the with the

07:48

bridge Piers um the steering system on a

07:52

on a ship like this is hydraulically

07:54

powered and so when you lose electrical

07:56

power you're going to lose the the

07:58

Hydraulics of course the rudder is

08:00

hydraulically powered so if they lost

08:03

steering if they lost power uh the ship

08:05

really cannot be steered so this

08:07

explains a lot right there so

08:09

essentially it sounds like this

08:11

indicates this was likely mechanical

08:13

error not user

08:16

error well uh that's what it sounds like

08:18

but there will be a very thorough

08:20

investigation and the real question

08:21

would be uh why if this is the case why

08:25

did the ship lose electrical power uh I

08:28

mean so why why did that happen that's

08:31

not supposed to happen so was there a

08:33

human error involved in that and what

08:36

kind of Clues Robert might we get from

08:38

both the ship itself and the surviving

08:41

crew

08:42

members we got a lot of lot of Clues

08:45

certainly uh with the surviving crew

08:47

they're going to be able to give their

08:48

firsthand account of it there's a

08:50

voidage data recorder which records a

08:53

lot of parameters of the ship like the

08:55

rudder angle and the propulsion of the

08:58

of the ship we'll have a void the

09:00

voidage data recorder also records audio

09:03

just like it would a a cockpit voice

09:05

recorder on a jet liner so there'll be a

09:07

lot of firsthand account of what

09:10

happened here and what the crew was was

09:12

experiencing and Robert we've been

09:14

showing our viewers this really dramatic

09:16

video all morning you see this massive

09:19

Bridge coming down in just a matter of

09:21

seconds so I have to ask you about you

09:23

know the question of infrastructure here

09:25

should a bridge like this have been

09:27

capable of withstanding a strike like

09:29

that

09:31

well I think when you're talking about a

09:33

ship that has has as much mass as this

09:36

ship does uh it would be physically

09:39

impossible to keep it from to keep to

09:42

design a bridge so that it could

09:43

withstand that sort of a of a hit so

09:47

Robert which agency now is going to be

09:48

leading the investigation into the

09:50

official cause what are the next steps

09:52

here so it will be um the investigation

09:56

will be conducted by both the NTSB and

09:58

the coast guard which of those will lead

10:01

that's up to them to decide if I had to

10:04

guess right now I would say that I

10:05

suspect the NTSB will be the lead agency

10:09

with the Coast Guard uh helping the NTSB

10:12

okay Robert salal thanks so much for

10:14

your time and your perspective we

10:16

appreciate this we have some information

10:18

from our CBS News data team and it shows

10:21

the latest Federal inspection of the Key

10:23

Bridge uh it scored a six out of nine

10:27

which is considered Fair uh it had been

10:29

in fair condition since 2008 one of the

10:33

concerns and this is from an inspection

10:34

in May 2022 was that the reinforced

10:38

concrete column one of those peers that

10:42

that the dolly the ship hit today that

10:45

it was downgraded from a health index of

10:48

77.8 to 64.9 that's in a May 2022

10:53

inspection a lot of people have

10:55

questioned just how the bridge could

10:58

collapse so fast uh again the the bridge

11:02

passed inspection but it's just worth

11:04

noting that there was a bit of concern

11:06

with the reinforced concrete column and

11:08

that the bridge was considered in fair

11:11

condition by federal inspectors with the

11:13

Department of Transportation rated 6 out

11:16

of nine overall so that is one of those

11:19

things that investigators are going to

11:21

be considering as they continue to look

11:24

into how the bridge collapsed continue

11:27

to look into the cause of this and of

11:29

course as the mayor has said those

11:31

search and rescue efforts are the

11:33

priority right now but it's just some

11:34

food for thought here as we continue to

11:36

look into every angle of this and just

11:39

to uh give you another look at what's

11:41

going on behind me not much has changed

11:43

we hear the helicopters in the air um we

11:47

are awaiting an update from local

11:49

officials as to whether they've been

11:51

able to get anyone else out of the water

11:54

uh and whether they've been able to

11:55

determine anything else about the cause

11:58

of this tragedy that happen here around

11:59

1:30 this morning for more on this

12:02

developing story we want to bring in

12:03

Kevin cartright the chief public

12:05

information officer for Baltimore fire

12:08

Uh Kevin I know you're a very busy

12:10

person today thanks for making time to

12:12

speak with us now we understand Cruiser

12:14

searching from the air and the water

12:15

this hour walk us through what's

12:17

happening on the ground the rescue

12:18

efforts underway right

12:21

now yes we do have our uh dive and

12:25

rescue teams um deployed uh as we we

12:29

have come into daylight right now we uh

12:32

will begin to reassess and uh determine

12:35

exactly how we will mostely and

12:38

efficiently be able to uh assess and

12:41

identify who we have in the water where

12:44

these victims are and how we'll best be

12:46

able to get uh to them um we will be

12:49

utilizing sonar um equipment as well as

12:52

infrared equipment to be able to

12:56

identify are so we have

13:00

us this morning okay we know two people

13:02

so far have been rescued seven

13:04

potentially or more are still being

13:07

search for any updates on those numbers

13:09

right now

13:10

Kevin actually those numbers uh remain

13:13

the same uh as I speak right now and

13:16

again uh the fact that we have daylight

13:19

right now will better Aid us in our

13:22

ability to uh be um uh successful

13:25

hopefully and and being able to identify

13:28

and location where these victims are as

13:31

I'm not far from the water's edge and I

13:33

can see that there is um a fair amount

13:36

of a current coming through here so the

13:38

fact that there tides coming through

13:41

could certainly take those individuals

13:44

uh bodies away from where they initially

13:47

may have gone into the water so we have

13:49

a few challenges ahead of us but we have

13:52

our dive rescue team members who are the

13:55

the most experienced and uh efficient

13:57

and and performing these types of tasks

14:00

so we're going to be relying heavily on

14:02

them and their expertise and you know

14:04

Kevin these images obviously just so

14:07

dramatic the devastation is so

14:09

widespread I'm wondering whether there

14:10

are any further structural concerns for

14:13

folks who are there part of the rescue

14:15

team on the ground and in the

14:17

water well certainly we are operating

14:20

cautiously uh with consideration that

14:23

this uh Bridge has collapsed so um

14:26

there's only so close that we'll be able

14:28

to get to

14:29

uh these structures uh with

14:31

consideration that hey this bridge has

14:33

just come down and we want to alleviate

14:36

and avoid any adverse um operating

14:39

conditions for our our rescue team

14:41

members Okay Kevin cartwrite thank you

14:43

so much for your time we appreciate this

14:46

you're quite welcome